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Amygdala damage impairs emotional memory for gist but not details of complex stimuli

Adolphs, Ralph and Tranel, Daniel and Buchanan, Tony W. (2005) Amygdala damage impairs emotional memory for gist but not details of complex stimuli. Nature Neuroscience, 8 (4). pp. 512-518. ISSN 1097-6256. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150319-101547811

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Abstract

Neurobiological studies demonstrate the amygdala's role in emotional memory, and psychological studies suggest a particular pattern: enhanced memory for the gist but not the details of complex stimuli. We hypothesized that these two findings are related. Whereas normal (n = 52) and brain-damaged (n = 22) controls showed the expected enhancement of gist memory when the encoding context was emotional, persons with unilateral damage to the medial temporal lobe including the amygdala (n = 16) did not show this pattern. Furthermore, amygdala volume showed a significant positive correlation with gist memory but not with overall memory. A further study in four subjects with selective medial temporal damage sparing the amygdala, and one with selective damage confined to the amygdala, confirmed the specificity of this effect to the amygdala. The data support a model whereby the amygdala focuses processing resources on gist, possibly accounting for features of traumatic memories and eyewitness testimony in real life.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn1413DOIArticle
http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/v8/n4/full/nn1413.htmlPublisherArticle
http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/v8/n4/suppinfo/nn1413_S1.htmlPublisherSupplementary Information
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Adolphs, Ralph0000-0002-8053-9692
Additional Information:© 2005 Nature Publishing Group. Received 29 October 2004; accepted 25 January 2005. We thank J. Nath, S. Lemker and M. Karafin for assistance in testing subjects, and D. Krutzfeldt and R. Henson for help in scheduling their visits. This study was supported by grant R01 MH67681 from the National Institute of Mental Health and by grant P01 19632 from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NIHR01 MH67681
NIHP01 19632
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)UNSPECIFIED
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)UNSPECIFIED
Issue or Number:4
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20150319-101547811
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150319-101547811
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:55928
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:19 Mar 2015 18:20
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 08:09

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