CaltechAUTHORS
  A Caltech Library Service

Importance of SoxE in neural crest development and the evolution of the pharynx

McCauley, David W. and Bronner-Fraser, Marianne (2006) Importance of SoxE in neural crest development and the evolution of the pharynx. Nature, 441 (7094). pp. 750-752. ISSN 0028-0836. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150325-104909857

[img] PDF (Supplementary Methods, Supplementary Figures 1–4 and Supplementary Discussion) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

370kB
[img] Video (QuickTime) (Supplementary Movie 1) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

1MB
[img] Video (QuickTime) (Supplementary Movie 2) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

430kB
[img] Video (QuickTime) (Supplementary Movie 3) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

1MB

Use this Persistent URL to link to this item: https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150325-104909857

Abstract

The neural crest, a defining character of vertebrates, is of prime importance to their evolutionary origin. To understand neural crest evolution, we explored molecular mechanisms underlying craniofacial development in the basal jawless vertebrate, sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), focusing on the SoxE (Sox8, Sox9 and Sox10) gene family. In jawed vertebrates, these are important transcriptional regulators of the neural crest, and the loss of Sox9 causes abnormal craniofacial development. Here we report that two lamprey SoxE genes are expressed in migrating neural crest and crest-derived prechondrocytes in posterior branchial arches, whereas a third paralogue is expressed later in the perichondrium and mandibular arch. Morpholino knock-down of SoxE1 reveals that it is essential for posterior branchial arch development, although the mandibular arch is unaffected. The results show that chondrogenic function of SoxE regulators can be traced to the lamprey–gnathostome common ancestor and indicate that lamprey SoxE genes might have undergone independent duplication to have distinct functions in mandibular versus caudal branchial arches. This work sheds light on the homology of vertebrate branchial arches and supports their common origin at the base of vertebrates.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature04691 DOIArticle
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v441/n7094/full/nature04691.htmlPublisherArticle
http://rdcu.be/coQGPublisherFree ReadCube access
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v441/n7094/suppinfo/nature04691.htmlPublisherSupplementary Information
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Bronner-Fraser, Marianne0000-0003-4274-1862
Additional Information:© 2006 Nature Publishing Group. Received 14 December 2005; Accepted 3 March 2006. We thank J. Langeland for providing embryonic cDNA libraries; D. Meulemans for SoxE oligonucleotide primer sequences, T. Sauka-Spengler for SoxE2 and SoxE3 library screens, R. Bergstedt and the staff at Hammond Bay Biological Station for facilities and technical assistance; R. Kusakabe for providing the LjMA2 DNA construct, and L. Trinh for assistance with confocal microscopy imaging techniques. This work was supported by a grant to M.B.F. from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NASAUNSPECIFIED
Issue or Number:7094
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20150325-104909857
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150325-104909857
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:56071
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:25 Mar 2015 19:16
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 08:11

Repository Staff Only: item control page