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Role for a cortical input to hippocampal area CA1 in the consolidation of a long-term memory

Remondes, Miguel and Schuman, Erin M. (2004) Role for a cortical input to hippocampal area CA1 in the consolidation of a long-term memory. Nature, 431 (7009). pp. 699-703. ISSN 0028-0836. doi:10.1038/nature02965. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150330-091139765

[img] Image (JPEG) (Supplementary Figure 1 Lesion data for animals included in the behavioural analyses shown in Figures 2 and 3) - Supplemental Material
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[img] Image (JPEG) (Supplementary Figure 2 More TA lesion data for all animals included in the behavioural analyses) - Supplemental Material
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[img] Image (JPEG) (Supplementary Figure 3 Visible platform data for all animals in all experiments. In addition, probe trial data for animals that received complete hippocampal lesions, and the sham and TA-lesioned animals probe trial at 24 hrs post-training) - Supplemental Material
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[img] PDF (Supplementary Methods Methods used for surgical procedures, lesion execution and assessment and electrophysiology) - Supplemental Material
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Abstract

A dialogue between the hippocampus and the neocortex is thought to underlie the formation, consolidation and retrieval of episodic memories, although the nature of this cortico-hippocampal communication is poorly understood. Using selective electrolytic lesions in rats, here we examined the role of the direct entorhinal projection (temporoammonic, TA) to the hippocampal area CA1 in short-term (24 hours) and long-term (four weeks) spatial memory in the Morris water maze. When short-term memory was examined, both sham- and TA-lesioned animals showed a significant preference for the target quadrant. When re-tested four weeks later, sham-lesioned animals exhibited long-term memory; in contrast, the TA-lesioned animals no longer showed target quadrant preference. Many long-lasting memories require a process called consolidation, which involves the exchange of information between the cortex and hippocampus. The disruption of long-term memory by the TA lesion could reflect a requirement for TA input during either the acquisition or consolidation of long-term memory. To distinguish between these possibilities, we trained animals, verified their spatial memory 24 hours later, and then subjected trained animals to TA lesions. TA-lesioned animals still exhibited a deficit in long-term memory, indicating a disruption of consolidation. Animals in which the TA lesion was delayed by three weeks, however, showed a significant preference for the target quadrant, indicating that the memory had already been adequately consolidated at the time of the delayed lesion. These results indicate that, after learning, ongoing cortical input conveyed by the TA path is required to consolidate long-term spatial memory.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature02965DOIArticle
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v431/n7009/full/nature02965.htmlPublisherArticle
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v431/n7009/suppinfo/nature02965.htmlPublisherSupplementary Information
http://rdcu.be/cq1zPublisherFree ReadCube access
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Schuman, Erin M.0000-0002-7053-1005
Additional Information:© 2004 Nature Publishing Group. Received 8 June; accepted 16 August 2004. We thank T. Siapas, G. Laurent, M. Sutton and other members of the Schuman laboratory for discussions. This work was supported by the Fundacao para a Ciencia e Technologia (FCT)—Portugal and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT)UNSPECIFIED
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)UNSPECIFIED
Issue or Number:7009
DOI:10.1038/nature02965
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20150330-091139765
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150330-091139765
Official Citation:Remondes, M., & Schuman, E. M. (2004). Role for a cortical input to hippocampal area CA1 in the consolidation of a long-term memory. [10.1038/nature02965]. Nature, 431(7009), 699-703.
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:56204
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Jason Perez
Deposited On:30 Mar 2015 20:00
Last Modified:10 Nov 2021 20:56

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