CaltechAUTHORS
  A Caltech Library Service

Gulf Stream density structure and transport during the past millennium

Lund, David C. and Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean and Curry, William B. (2006) Gulf Stream density structure and transport during the past millennium. Nature, 444 (7119). pp. 601-604. ISSN 0028-0836. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150401-105745382

[img] PDF (Supplementary Figure 1 Stable isotope analyses for the Florida Straits cores were based primarily on Cibicidoides species from the >250 mum size fraction) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

220Kb
[img] PDF (Supplementary Figure 2 Stable isotope analyses for the Florida Straits cores were based primarily on Cibicidoides species from the >250 mum size fraction) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

190Kb
[img] PDF (Supplementary Figure 3 Quantification of the relationship between foraminiferal delta18O (delta18Oc) and seawater sigmat) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

199Kb
[img] PDF (Supplementary Figure 4 Comparison of core top foraminiferal and CTD density values from Dry Tortugas and Great Bahama Bank indicates the stable oxygen isotopic composition of the benthic foraminifera used in this study reliably record the density structur) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

143Kb
[img] PDF (Supplementary Figure 5 A shift in the level of no motion from 850 to 950 m during the Little Ice Age, but with the same shear, would produce a total volume transport of ~31 Sv, equal to the modern value) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

122Kb
[img] PDF (Supplementary Figure 6 An isotopic depletion of the fresh-water end member results in a steeper delta18Ow-S slope (top) which in turn alters the polynomial fit to the delta18Oc -sigmat data in the range occupied by the Dry Tortugas and Bahamas benthic del) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

175Kb
[img] MS Word (Supplementary Methods and Supplementary Data) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

86Kb
[img] MS Word (Supplementary Table 1 Dry Tortugas Radiocarbon Ages) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

85Kb
[img] MS Word (Supplementary Table 2 Great Bahama Bank Radiocarbon Ages) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

109Kb

Use this Persistent URL to link to this item: https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150401-105745382

Abstract

The Gulf Stream transports approximately 31 Sv (1 Sv = 10^6 m^3 s^(-1)) of water and 1.3 10^(15) W of heat into the North Atlantic ocean. The possibility of abrupt changes in Gulf Stream heat transport is one of the key uncertainties in predictions of climate change for the coming centuries. Given the limited length of the instrumental record, our knowledge of Gulf Stream behaviour on long timescales must rely heavily on information from geologic archives. Here we use foraminifera from a suite of high-resolution sediment cores in the Florida Straits to show that the cross-current density gradient and vertical current shear of the Gulf Stream were systematically lower during the Little Ice Age (AD ~1200 to 1850). We also estimate that Little Ice Age volume transport was ten per cent weaker than today's. The timing of reduced flow is consistent with temperature minima in several palaeoclimate records, implying that diminished oceanic heat transport may have contributed to Little Ice Age cooling in the North Atlantic. The interval of low flow also coincides with anomalously high Gulf Stream surface salinity, suggesting a tight linkage between the Atlantic Ocean circulation and hydrologic cycle during the past millennium.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature05277 DOIArticle
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v444/n7119/full/nature05277.htmlPublisherArticle
http://rdcu.be/cr5DPublisherFree ReadCube access
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v444/n7119/suppinfo/nature05277.htmlPublisherSupplementary Information
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Lund, David C.0000-0002-4847-2889
Additional Information:© 2006 Nature Publishing Group. Received 14 March 2006; Accepted 19 September 2006. We thank O. Marchal, L. Keigwin, D. Oppo and J. McManus for suggestions. We also thank D. Ostermann, M. Jeglinski, P. Cerulli, S. Thorrold and S. Birdwhistle for technical support. We are grateful to the WHOI core lab for sample collection and archiving, the captain and crew of the R/V Knorr, and to the Sea Education Association for access to their vessel Westward. This work was supported by the US National Science Foundation.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSFUNSPECIFIED
Issue or Number:7119
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20150401-105745382
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150401-105745382
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:56282
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:01 Apr 2015 19:19
Last Modified:09 Mar 2020 13:19

Repository Staff Only: item control page