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How Self-Determined Choice Facilitates Performance: A Key Role of the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex

Murayama, Kou and Matsumoto, Madoka and Izuma, Keise and Sugiura, Ayaka and Ryan, Richard M. and Deci, Edward L. and Matsumoto, Kenji (2015) How Self-Determined Choice Facilitates Performance: A Key Role of the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex. Cerebral Cortex, 25 (5). pp. 1241-1251. ISSN 1047-3211. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150603-101144231

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Abstract

Recent studies have documented that self-determined choice does indeed enhance performance. However, the precise neural mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. We examined the neural correlates of the facilitative effects of self-determined choice using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants played a game-like task involving a stopwatch with either a stopwatch they selected (self-determined-choice condition) or one they were assigned without choice (forced-choice condition). Our results showed that self-determined choice enhanced performance on the stopwatch task, despite the fact that the choices were clearly irrelevant to task difficulty. Neuroimaging results showed that failure feedback, compared with success feedback, elicited a drop in the vmPFC activation in the forced-choice condition, but not in the self-determined-choice condition, indicating that negative reward value associated with the failure feedback vanished in the self-determined-choice condition. Moreover, the vmPFC resilience to failure in the self-determined-choice condition was significantly correlated with the increased performance. Striatal responses to failure and success feedback were not modulated by the choice condition, indicating the dissociation between the vmPFC and striatal activation pattern. These findings suggest that the vmPFC plays a unique and critical role in the facilitative effects of self-determined choice on performance.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bht317 DOIArticle
http://cercor.oxfordjournals.org/content/25/5/1241PublisherArticle
Additional Information:© The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. Advance Access publication December 2, 2013. This study was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (A#24240061; to K. Matsumoto), a Grand-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas “The study on the neural dynamics for understanding communication in terms of complex hetero systems (No. 4103)” (#24120717; to K. Matsumoto), and Tamagawa University Global Center of Excellence grant from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology, and a Grant from the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare (H24-seishin-ippan-002; to K. Matsumoto) Japan.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)24240061
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)24120717
Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare (Japan)H24-seishin-ippan-002
Tamagawa University Global Centers of ExcellenceUNSPECIFIED
Issue or Number:5
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20150603-101144231
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150603-101144231
Official Citation:Kou Murayama, Madoka Matsumoto, Keise Izuma, Ayaka Sugiura, Richard M. Ryan, Edward L. Deci, and Kenji Matsumoto How Self-Determined Choice Facilitates Performance: A Key Role of the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Cereb. Cortex (2015) 25 (5): 1241-1251 first published online December 2, 2013 doi:10.1093/cercor/bht317
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:57972
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:03 Jun 2015 17:27
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 08:30

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