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Co-evolution of black hole growth and star formation from a cross-correlation analysis between quasars and the cosmic infrared background

Wang, Lingyu and Viero, Marco and Ross, Nicholas P. and Asboth, Viktoria and Béthermin, Matthieu and Bock, Jamie and Clements, Dave and Conley, Alex and Cooray, Asantha and Farrah, Duncan and Hajian, Amir and Han, Jiaxin and Lagache, Guilaine and Marsden, Gaelen and Myers, Adam and Norberg, Peder and Oliver, Sebastian and Page, Mat and Symeonidis, Myrto and Schulz, Bernhard and Wang, Wenting and Zemcov, Mike (2015) Co-evolution of black hole growth and star formation from a cross-correlation analysis between quasars and the cosmic infrared background. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 449 (4). pp. 4476-4493. ISSN 0035-8711. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150629-075947984

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Abstract

We present the first cross-correlation measurement between Sloan Digital Sky Survey type 1 quasars and the cosmic infrared background (CIB) measured by Herschel. The quasars cover the redshift range 0.15 < z < 3.5 where most of the CIB originates. We detect the sub-millimetre emission of the quasars, which dominates on small scales, and correlated emission from dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) dominant on larger scales. The mean flux of the Data Release 7 (DR7) quasars (median redshift 〈z〉 = 1.4) is 11.1, 7.1 and 3.6 mJy at 250, 350 and 500 μm, respectively, while the mean flux of the DR9 quasars (〈z〉 = 2.5) is 5.7, 5.0 and 1.8 mJy at 250, 350 and 500 μm, respectively. Assuming a modified blackbody spectral energy distribution with a power law in the mid-infrared, we infer that the mean infrared luminosity of the DR7 and DR9 quasars is 10^(12.4) and 10^(12.8) L_⊙, respectively. The correlated emission arises from DSFGs in the same halo as the quasar (the one-halo term) and DSFGs in separate haloes correlated with the quasar-hosting halo (the two-halo term). Using a simple halo model, we find that most quasars are hosted by central galaxies. The host halo mass scale of the DR7 central and satellite quasars is 10^(12.4 ± 0.9) and 10^(13.6 ± 0.4) M_⊙, respectively. The host halo mass scale of the DR9 central and satellite quasars is 10^(12.3 ± 0.6) and 10^(12.8 ± 0.4) M_⊙, respectively. Thus, the halo environment of the central quasars is similar to that of the most actively star-forming galaxies, which supports the view that dusty starburst and quasar activity are evolutionarily linked.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stv559DOIArticle
http://mnras.oxfordjournals.org/content/449/4/4476.abstractPublisherArticle
http://arxiv.org/abs/1406.7181arXivDiscussion Paper
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Ross, Nicholas P.0000-0003-1830-6473
Béthermin, Matthieu0000-0002-3915-2015
Bock, Jamie0000-0002-5710-5212
Clements, Dave0000-0002-9548-5033
Cooray, Asantha0000-0002-3892-0190
Farrah, Duncan0000-0003-1748-2010
Han, Jiaxin0000-0002-8010-6715
Lagache, Guilaine0000-0003-1492-2519
Norberg, Peder0000-0002-5875-0440
Oliver, Sebastian0000-0001-7862-1032
Page, Mat0000-0002-6689-6271
Zemcov, Mike0000-0001-8253-1451
Additional Information:© 2015 The Authors. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society. Accepted 2015 March 11. Received 2015 March 9; in original form 2014 June 20. First published online April 14, 2015. LW and PN acknowledge support from an ERC StG grant (DEGAS- 259586). SPIRE has been developed by a consortium of institutes led by Cardiff Univ. (UK) and including Univ. Lethbridge (Canada); NAOC (China); CEA, LAM (France); IFSI, Univ. Padua (Italy); IAC (Spain); Stockholm Observatory (Sweden); Imperial College London, RAL, UCL-MSSL, UKATC, Univ. Sussex (UK); Caltech, JPL, NHSC, Univ. Colorado (USA). This development has been supported by national funding agencies: CSA (Canada); NAOC (China); CEA, CNES, CNRS (France); ASI (Italy); MCINN (Spain); SNSB (Sweden); STFC (UK); and NASA (USA). Funding for the SDSS and SDSS-II has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Participating Institutions, the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Energy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Japanese Monbukagakusho, the Max Planck Society, and the Higher Education Funding Council for England. The SDSS website is http://www.sdss.org/. The SDSS is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium for the Participating Institutions. The Participating Institutions are the American Museum of Natural History, Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, University of Basel, University of Cambridge, Case Western Reserve University, University of Chicago, Drexel University, Fermilab, the Institute for Advanced Study, the Japan Participation Group, Johns Hopkins University, the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, the Korean Scientist Group, the Chinese Academy of Sciences (LAMOST), Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), the Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics (MPA), New Mexico State University, Ohio State University, University of Pittsburgh, University of Portsmouth, Princeton University, the United States Naval Observatory and the University of Washington. Funding for SDSS-III has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Participating Institutions, the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Energy Office of Science. The SDSS-III website is http://www.sdss3.org/. SDSS-III is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium for the Participating Institutions of the SDSS-III Collaboration including the University of Arizona, the Brazilian Participation Group, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Carnegie Mellon University, University of Florida, the French Participation Group, the German Participation Group, Harvard University, the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, the Michigan State/Notre Dame/JINA Participation Group, Johns Hopkins University, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, New Mexico State University, New York University, Ohio State University, Pennsylvania State University, University of Portsmouth, Princeton University, the Spanish Participation Group, University of Tokyo, University of Utah, Vanderbilt University, University of Virginia, University of Washington and Yale University.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
European Research Council (ERC)DEGAS-259586
Canadian Space Agency (CSA)UNSPECIFIED
National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC)UNSPECIFIED
Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA)UNSPECIFIED
Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES)UNSPECIFIED
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)UNSPECIFIED
Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI)UNSPECIFIED
Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MCINN)UNSPECIFIED
Swedish National Space Board (SNSB)UNSPECIFIED
Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC)UNSPECIFIED
NASAUNSPECIFIED
Alfred P. Sloan FoundationUNSPECIFIED
NSFUNSPECIFIED
Department of Energy (DOE)UNSPECIFIED
Japanese MonbukagakushoUNSPECIFIED
Max Planck SocietyUNSPECIFIED
Higher Education Funding Council for EnglandUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:galaxies: evolution; galaxies: haloes; galaxies: high-redshift; quasars: general; submillimetre: galaxies
Issue or Number:4
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20150629-075947984
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150629-075947984
Official Citation: Lingyu Wang, Marco Viero, Nicholas P. Ross, Viktoria Asboth, Matthieu Béthermin, Jamie Bock, Dave Clements, Alex Conley, Asantha Cooray, Duncan Farrah, Amir Hajian, Jiaxin Han, Guilaine Lagache, Gaelen Marsden, Adam Myers, Peder Norberg, Seb Oliver, Mat Page, Myrto Symeonidis, Bernhard Schulz, Wenting Wang, and Mike Zemcov Co-evolution of black hole growth and star formation from a cross-correlation analysis between quasars and the cosmic infrared background MNRAS (June 01, 2015) Vol. 449 4476-4493 doi:10.1093/mnras/stv559 First published online April 14, 2015
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:58649
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Ruth Sustaita
Deposited On:29 Jun 2015 22:22
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 08:38

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