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Mars Exploration with Directed Aerial Robot Explorers

Pankine, Alexey A. and Aaron, Kim M. and Heun, Matthew K. and Nock, Kerry T. and Schlaifer, R. Stephen and Ingersoll, Andrew P. and Lorenz, Ralph D. (2004) Mars Exploration with Directed Aerial Robot Explorers. In: Space Technology and Applications International Forum--STAIF 2004. AIP conference proceedings. No.699. American Institute of Physics , Melville, NY, pp. 1019-1026. ISBN 0-7354-0171-3. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20151224-091207296

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Abstract

Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC) is developing a revolutionary system architecture for exploration of planetary atmospheres and surfaces from atmospheric altitudes. The work is supported by the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts (NIAC). The innovative system architecture relies upon the use of Directed Aerial Robot Explorers (DAREs), which essentially are long‐duration‐flight autonomous balloons with trajectory control capabilities that can deploy swarms of miniature probes over multiple target areas. Balloon guidance capabilities will offer unprecedented opportunities in high‐resolution, targeted observations of both atmospheric and surface phenomena. Multifunctional microprobes will be deployed from the balloons when over the target areas, and perform a multitude of functions, such as atmospheric profiling or surface exploration, relaying data back to the balloons or an orbiter. This architecture will enable low‐cost, low‐energy, long‐term global exploration of planetary atmospheres and surfaces. A conceptual analysis of DARE capabilities and science applications for Mars is presented. Initial results of simulations indicate that a relatively small trajectory control wing can significantly change planetary balloon flight paths, especially during summer seasons in Polar Regions. This opens new possibilities for high‐resolution observations of crustal magnetic anomalies, polar layered terrain, polar clouds, dust storms at the edges of the Polar caps and of seasonal variability of volatiles in the atmosphere.


Item Type:Book Section
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.1649668DOIArticle
http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/proceeding/aipcp/10.1063/1.1649668PublisherArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Ingersoll, Andrew P.0000-0002-2035-9198
Lorenz, Ralph D.0000-0001-8528-4644
Additional Information:© 2004 American Institute of Physics. This work was supported by the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts (NIAC) under USRA Contract no. 07600-099.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NASA07600-099
Series Name:AIP conference proceedings
Issue or Number:699
DOI:10.1063/1.1649668
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20151224-091207296
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20151224-091207296
Official Citation:Mars Exploration with Directed Aerial Robot Explorers Pankine, Alexey A. and Aaron, Kim M. and Heun, Matthew K. and Nock, Kerry T. and Schlaifer, R. Stephen and Ingersoll, Andrew P. and Lorenz, Ralph D., AIP Conference Proceedings, 699, 1019-1026 (2004), DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.1649668
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:63220
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:24 Dec 2015 17:25
Last Modified:10 Nov 2021 23:13

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