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Imaging Cell Migration in Chick Explant Cultures

Kasemeier-Kulesa, Jennifer C. and Lefcort, Frances and Fraser, Scott E. and Kulesa, Paul M. (2011) Imaging Cell Migration in Chick Explant Cultures. In: Imaging in Developmental Biology: a laboratory manual. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press , Cold Spring Harbor, NY, pp. 291-298. ISBN 978-0-87969-940-6. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160203-161400202

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Abstract

Migratory cells can travel long distances within the embryo to reach peripheral structures. How cells arrive at precise targets remains unclear, largely because of limitations in the ability to resolve how cells respond to microenvironmental signals and communicate positional information to each other. The avian embryo is a good model system for studying cell migration because the embryos are accessible to tissue transplantation, molecular perturbation, cell labeling, and culture outside of the eg. In particular, several clever culture methods have been developed that allow cell migratory behavior to be analyzed in the intact avian embryo or in tissue explants using optical time-lapse microscopy. Furthermore, advances in cell labeling of avian embryos, using either photoactivation or electroporation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP variants, allow targeted marking of cell subpopulations at discrete points in development. The combination of new culture methods and targeted cell labeling has significantly enhanced the ability to observe and perturb normal cell movements during important early developmental events, such as cranial neural crest migration, gastrulation, and vasculogenesis. This chapter describes a chick explant culture technique that allows visualization of deep cell movements with single cell resolution in older embryos. This technique provides a means to visualize cell migration both along dorsoventral migratory pathways and along the rostrocaudal axis. It also maintains cell resolution without disruptions caused by vibration from the heartbeat.


Item Type:Book Section
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Fraser, Scott E.0000-0002-5377-0223
Additional Information:© 2011 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20160203-161400202
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160203-161400202
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:64214
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: George Porter
Deposited On:04 Feb 2016 16:32
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 09:35

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