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FGF Signaling Mediates Regeneration of the Differentiating Cerebellum through Repatterning of the Anterior Hindbrain and Reinitiation of Neuronal Migration

Köster, Reinhard W. and Fraser, Scott E. (2006) FGF Signaling Mediates Regeneration of the Differentiating Cerebellum through Repatterning of the Anterior Hindbrain and Reinitiation of Neuronal Migration. Journal of Neuroscience, 26 (27). pp. 7293-7304. ISSN 0270-6474. PMCID PMC6673949. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160212-083833906

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Abstract

To address the regenerative capability of the differentiating hindbrain, we ablated the cerebellum in wild-type and transgenic zebrafish embryos. These larvae showed no obvious locomotive malfunction several days after the ablation. Expression analysis and in vivo time-lapse recording in GFP (green fluorescent protein)-transgenic embryos indicate that cerebellar neuronal cells can regenerate from the remaining anterior hindbrain. The onset of regeneration is accompanied by repatterning within the anterior hindbrain. Inhibition of FGF signaling immediately after cerebellar ablation results in the lack of regenerating cerebellar neuronal cells and the absence of cerebellar structures several days later. Moreover, impaired FGF signaling inhibits the repatterning of the anterior hindbrain and the reexpression of rhombic lip marker genes soon after cerebellar ablation. This demonstrates that the hindbrain is highly plastic in recapitulating early embryonic differentiation mechanisms during regeneration. Moreover, the regenerating system offers a means to uncouple cerebellar differentiation from complex morphogenetic tissue rearrangements.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0095-06.2006DOIArticle
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmc6673949/PubMed CentralArticle
http://www.jneurosci.org/content/26/27/7293/suppl/DC1Related ItemSupplemental Data
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Fraser, Scott E.0000-0002-5377-0223
Additional Information:© 2006 Society for Neuroscience. For the first six months after publication SfN’s license will be exclusive. Beginning six months after publication the Work will be made freely available to the public on SfN’s website to copy, distribute, or display under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Received Jan. 10, 2006; revised May 29, 2006; accepted May 31, 2006. This work was generously supported by the National Institutes of Health, the Caltech Biological Imaging Center, and the German Ministry for Education and Research through BioFuture Award 0311889. We thank Tanya Demyanenko and Aura Keeter for excellent technical assistance and animal care. We thank Nilima Prakash for critical discussion of this manuscript. We thank the members of the Fraser, Wurst, and Bally-Cuif laboratories for discussion and helpful suggestions. We are grateful to Shuo Lin for providing us with the transgenic gata1:gfp zebrafish line. For the generous gift of the zebrinII antibody, we thank Richard Hawkes. We thank Hazel Sive, Laure Bally-Cuif, Michael Brand, and Bernard Thisse for kindly providing zebrafish cDNA constructs.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NIHUNSPECIFIED
Caltech Biological Imaging CenterUNSPECIFIED
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)0311889
Subject Keywords:zebrafish; cerebellum; regeneration; plasticity; neuronal migration; bioimaging
Issue or Number:27
PubMed Central ID:PMC6673949
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20160212-083833906
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160212-083833906
Official Citation:FGF Signaling Mediates Regeneration of the Differentiating Cerebellum through Repatterning of the Anterior Hindbrain and Reinitiation of Neuronal Migration Reinhard W. Köster and Scott E. Fraser The Journal of Neuroscience, 5 July 2006, 26(27):7293-7304; doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0095-06.2006
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:64453
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Ruth Sustaita
Deposited On:19 Feb 2016 21:55
Last Modified:02 Jul 2020 18:57

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