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Looking deeper into vertebrate development

Jacobs, Russell E. and Ahrens, Eric T. and Meade, Thomas J. and Fraser, Scott E. (1999) Looking deeper into vertebrate development. Trends in Cell Biology, 9 (2). pp. 73-76. ISSN 0962-8924. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160324-072837396

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Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive imaging method that provides three-dimensional (3-D) images of the internal structure of opaque objects, such as humans and mice. In optimal situations, spatial resolution can approach the micron level. Arbitrarily oriented single-slice images can be obtained in seconds, with full 3-D volume images taking tens of minutes to collect. The exquisite sensitivity of MRI to the local physical and chemical environment provides a wide range of mechanisms giving rise to intrinsic contrast in the MR experiment, thus providing images with dramatic differences between different tissue types (e.g. white vs grey matter, myelinated vs unmyelinated fibres, and brain parenchyma vs ventricles). The recent advent of physiologically sensitive MRI contrast agents opens up a wealth of new avenues of study, even including the in vivo imaging of gene expression.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0962-8924(98)01435-4DOIArticle
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0962892498014354PublisherArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Jacobs, Russell E.0000-0002-1382-8486
Fraser, Scott E.0000-0002-5377-0223
Additional Information:© 1999 Elsevier Science. We thank David Laidlaw for assistance with computational and visualization aspects of the DTI. This work was supported by the Beckman Institute at Caltech; by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; and by the Human Brain Project with contributions from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the National Science Foundation. E. T. A. acknowledges support from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Grant F32NS10384
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Caltech Beckman InstituteUNSPECIFIED
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)UNSPECIFIED
Human Brain ProjectUNSPECIFIED
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)UNSPECIFIED
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)UNSPECIFIED
NSFUNSPECIFIED
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)F32 NS10384
Subject Keywords:cell biology; developmental biology; cell fate; gene expression; microscopy; mouse; neurodevelopment; magnetic resonance imaging
Issue or Number:2
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20160324-072837396
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160324-072837396
Official Citation:Russell E Jacobs, Eric T Ahrens, Thomas J Mead, Scott E Fraser, Looking deeper into vertebrate development, Trends in Cell Biology, Volume 9, Issue 2, 1 February 1999, Pages 73-76, ISSN 0962-8924, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0962-8924(98)01435-4. (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0962892498014354)
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:65641
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Ruth Sustaita
Deposited On:24 Mar 2016 16:01
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 09:49

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