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Foreground Science Knowledge and Prospects

Fraisse, Aurélien A. and Brown, Jo-Anne C. and Dobler, Gregory and Dotson, Jessie L. and Draine, Bruce T. and Frisch, Priscilla C. and Haverkorn, Marijke and Hirata, Christopher M. and Jansson, Ronnie and Lazarian, Alex and Magalhães, Antonio Mario and Waelkens, André and Wolleben, Maik (2009) Foreground Science Knowledge and Prospects. In: CMB Polarization Workshop; Theory and Foregrounds, CMBPol Mission Concept. AIP Conference Proceedings. No.1141. American Institute of Physics , Melville, NY, pp. 265-310. ISBN 978-0-7354-0678-0. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160505-164917410

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Abstract

Detecting “B‐mode” (i.e., divergence free) polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) would open a new window on the very early Universe. However, the polarized microwave sky is dominated by polarized Galactic dust and synchrotron emissions, which may hinder our ability to test inflationary predictions. In this paper, we report on our knowledge of these “Galactic foregrounds,” as well as on how a CMB satellite mission aiming at detecting a primordial B‐mode signal (“CMBPol”) will contribute to improving it. We review the observational and analysis techniques used to constrain the structure of the Galactic magnetic field, whose presence is responsible for the polarization of Galactic emissions. Although our current understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium is somewhat limited, dramatic improvements in our knowledge of its properties are expected by the time CMBPol flies. Thanks to high resolution and high sensitivity instruments observing the whole sky at frequencies between 30 GHz and 850 GHz, CMBPol will not only improve this picture by observing the synchrotron emission from our galaxy, but also help constrain dust models. Polarized emission form interstellar dust indeed dominates over any other signal in CMBol’s highest frequency channels. Observations at these wavelengths, combined with ground‐based studies of starlight polarization, will therefore enable us to improve our understanding of dust properties and of the mechanism(s) responsible for the alignment of dust grains with the Galactic magnetic field. CMBPol will also shed new light on observations that are presently not well understood. Morphological studies of anomalous dust and synchrotron emissions will indeed constrain their natures and properties, while searching for fluctuations in the emission from heliospheric dust will test our understanding of the circumheliospheric interstellar medium. Finally, acquiring more information on the properties of extra‐Galactic sources will be necessary in order to maximaize the cosmological constrainsts extracted from CMBPol’s observations of CMB lensing.


Item Type:Book Section
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3160889DOIArticle
http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/proceeding/aipcp/10.1063/1.3160889PublisherArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Draine, Bruce T.0000-0002-0846-936X
Hirata, Christopher M.0000-0002-2951-4932
Additional Information:© 2009 American Institute of Physics. Published online 09 June 2009. This research was partly funded by NASA Mission Concept Study award NNX08AT71G S01. We also acknowledge the organizational work of the Primordial Polarization Program Definition Team (PPPDT). AAF was supported by NSF grant AST-0707932 and Princeton University. PCF acknowledges support from NASA grant NNX08AJ33G, AL from NSF grant AST-0507164 and the NSF Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, and AMM from FAPESP and CNPq. AAF would like to thank D. P. Finkbeiner and J. E. Vaillancourt for their contributions to the CMBPol Theory Workshop held at Fermilab in June 2008, L. A. Page for stimulating discussions, D. N. Spergel for comments on a draft version of this paper, and R. H. Lupton for making the SM plotting program available to him. AMM is grateful to all members of the IAG Polarimetry Group for their continued support. Typesetting of this document was made easier by the use of NASA’s Astrophysics Data System Bibliographic Services and of the AASTEX package. All the Planck-related numbers and information referred to in this document are from the Planck scientific program (also known as “blue book”) available online in PDF format at http://www.rssd.esa.int/planck/.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NASANNX08AT71G S01
NSFAST-0707932
Princeton UniversityUNSPECIFIED
NASANNX08AJ33G
NSFAST-0507164
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP)UNSPECIFIED
Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq)UNSPECIFIED
Series Name:AIP Conference Proceedings
Issue or Number:1141
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20160505-164917410
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160505-164917410
Official Citation:Foreground Science Knowledge and Prospects Fraisse, Aurélien A. and Brown, Jo‐Anne C. and Dobler, Gregory and Dotson, Jessie L. and Draine, Bruce T. and Frisch, Priscilla C. and Haverkorn, Marijke and Hirata, Christopher M. and Jansson, Ronnie and Lazarian, Alex and Magalhães, Antonio Mario and Waelkens, André and Wolleben, Maik, AIP Conference Proceedings, 1141, 265-310 (2009), DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3160889
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:66706
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: George Porter
Deposited On:09 May 2016 20:46
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 09:59

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