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The role of single occupancy effects on integrase dynamics in a cell-free system

Artavanis, Georgios and Hsiao, Victoria and Hayes, Clarmyra A. and Murray, Richard M. (2016) The role of single occupancy effects on integrase dynamics in a cell-free system. . (Submitted) http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160706-081948550

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Abstract

Phage integrase-based circuits are an alternative approach to relying on transcriptional and translational repression for biomolecular circuits. Previous research has shown that circuits based on integrases can perform a variety of functions, including counters, Boolean logic operators, memory modules and temporal event detectors. It is therefore essential to develop a principled theoretical and experimental framework for the design, implementation and study of such circuits. One of the fundamental questions that such a framework should address concerns the functionality limitations and temporal dynamics of the integrases as regulatory elements. Here, we test the functionality of several large serine integrases from a recently published library in a cell-free transcription-translation (TX-TL) platform. Additionally, we use a combination of experimental data and models to investigate integrase dynamics as a function of enzyme concentration and number of binding sites. We report that sequestration of integrase molecules, either in the form of monomers or dimers, by the integrase's own binding sites dominates integrase dynamics, and that the delay in the activation of the reporter is negatively correlated with integrase plasmid concentration. We have validated our sequestration hypothesis by building a model with MATLAB’s SimBiology toolbox, and running simulations with various integrase and binding sites concentrations. The simulation results qualitatively match the experimental results, and offer further insights into the system.


Item Type:Report or Paper (Discussion Paper)
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/059675DOIArticle
http://biorxiv.org/content/early/2016/06/18/059675OrganizationArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Hsiao, Victoria0000-0001-9297-1522
Murray, Richard M.0000-0002-5785-7481
Additional Information:bioRxiv preprint first posted online Jun. 18, 2016; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/059675. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not peer-reviewed) is the author/funder. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license. G.A. is supported by Caltech BBE Divisional Funding. V.H. is supported by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program. Research supported in part by the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies through grant W911NF-09-0001 from the U.S. Army Research Office. The content of the information does not necessarily reflect the position or the policy of the Government, and no official endorsement should be inferred.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
CaltechUNSPECIFIED
National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) FellowshipUNSPECIFIED
Army Research Office (ARO)W911NF-09-0001
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20160706-081948550
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160706-081948550
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:68844
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:07 Jul 2016 02:49
Last Modified:07 Feb 2017 00:53

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