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Atmospheric Carbon Particles and the Los Angeles Visibility Problem

Larson, Susan M. and Cass, Glen R. and Gray, H. Andrew (1989) Atmospheric Carbon Particles and the Los Angeles Visibility Problem. Aerosol Science and Technology, 10 (1). pp. 118-130. ISSN 0278-6826. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160715-074258036

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Abstract

The control of atmospheric primary carbonaceous particles is central to protecting visibility. In the Los Angeles area, fine particulate carbon accounts for 40% of fine particulate mass concentration on an annual average basis and 33% of the fine aerosol mass during summer midday periods. Visibility modeling shows that aerosol carbon contributes up to 39% of the total scattering coefficient and up to 44% of the extinction coefficient in the Los Angeles area during summer midday periods. Using the results of the primary aerosol carbon emission control strategy study by Gray (1986), which determined the least costly set of controls necessary to achieve reduced levels of primary carbonaceous aerosol in the Los Angeles area, it is estimated that an 8%–14% decrease in the average 1984 summer midday extinction coefficient could be achieved at Pasadena if primary aerosol carbon emission controls costing $80.4 × 10^6 year^(−1) (1982 dollars) had been in place at that time. An 11%–19% decrease in the extinction coefficient is estimated to result from controls costing $423.5 × 10^6 year^(−1) (1982 dollars).


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02786828908959227DOIArticle
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02786828908959227PublisherArticle
Additional Information:© 1989 Elsevier Science Publishing Co. Received: 22 Dec 1987. Accepted: 29 Apr 1988. The authors wish to thank Dr Kenneth McCue for his assistance in preparing graphs showing the frequency distribution of low visibility events. This work was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, by a grant from the Hewlett Foundation, and by gifts to the Environmental Quality Laboratory.
Group:Environmental Quality Laboratory
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NASAUNSPECIFIED
Hewlett FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20160715-074258036
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160715-074258036
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:69041
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Ruth Sustaita
Deposited On:27 Jul 2016 21:12
Last Modified:27 Jul 2016 21:12

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