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Analyses of Compact Trichinella Kinomes Reveal a MOS-like Protein Kinase with a Unique N-terminal Domain

Stroehlein, Andreas J. and Young, Neil D. and Korhonen, Pasi K. and Chang, Bill C. H. and Sternberg, Paul W. and La Rosa, Giuseppe and Pozio, Edoardo and Gasser, Robin B. (2016) Analyses of Compact Trichinella Kinomes Reveal a MOS-like Protein Kinase with a Unique N-terminal Domain. G3, 6 (9). pp. 2847-2856. ISSN 2160-1836 . PMCID PMC5015942. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160725-131922343

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[img] PDF (Figure S1 - Trees representing the phylogenetic relationship of eukaryotic protein kinase (ePK) sequences between Trichinella spiralis (T1) and T.) - Supplemental Material
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[img] PDF (Figure S2 - Clusters of orthologs among Trichinella spiralis (T1), T.) - Supplemental Material
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[img] MS Excel (Table S1 - The Trichinella spiralis (T1) kinome, orthologs in T. ) - Supplemental Material
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[img] MS Excel (Table S2 - The Trichinella pseudospiralis (T4.1) kinome, orthologs in T. spiralis (T1), amino acid sequence identities and similarities) - Supplemental Material
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[img] MS Excel (Table S3 - Clusters of orthologs among Trichinella spiralis (T1)) - Supplemental Material
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[img] MS Excel (Table S4 - Clusters of orthologs among Trichinella spiralis (T1), T. pseudospiralis (T4.1) and Caenorhabditis elegans (CEL).) - Submitted Version
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[img] MS Excel (Table S5 - Clusters of orthologs among Trichinella spiralis (T1), T. pseudospiralis (T4.1) and Homo sapiens (HSA).) - Supplemental Material
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[img] MS Excel (Table S6 - Clusters of orthologs between Trichinella spiralis (T1) and T. pseudospiralis (T4.1). (.xlsx, 22 KB) ) - Supplemental Material
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[img] MS Excel (Table S7 - Trichinella pseudospiralis (T4.1) sequences without orthologs in other species. (.xlsx, 9 KB) ) - Supplemental Material
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[img] MS Excel (Table S8 - Clusters of orthologs between Caenorhabditis elegans (CEL) and Homo sapiens (HSA). (.xlsx, 26 KB) ) - Supplemental Material
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[img] MS Excel (Table S9 - Caenorhabditis elegans (CEL) sequences without orthologs in other species. (.xlsx, 125 KB) ) - Supplemental Material
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[img] MS Excel (Table S10 - Homo sapiens (HSA) sequences without orthologs in other species. (.xlsx, 125 KB)) - Supplemental Material
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Abstract

Parasitic worms of the genus Trichinella (phylum Nematoda; class Enoplea) represent a complex of at least twelve taxa that infect a range of different host animals, including humans, around the world. They are foodborne, intracellular nematodes, and their life cycles differ substantially from those of other nematodes. The recent characterization of the genomes and transcriptomes of all twelve recognized taxa of Trichinella now allows, for the first time, detailed studies of their molecular biology. In the present study, we defined, curated, and compared the protein kinase complements (kinomes) of Trichinella spiralis and T. pseudospiralis using an integrated bioinformatic workflow employing transcriptomic and genomic data sets. We examined how variation in the kinome might link to unique aspects of Trichinella morphology, biology, and evolution. Furthermore, we utilized in silico structural modeling to discover and characterize a novel, MOS-like kinase with an unusual, previously undescribed N-terminal domain. Taken together, the present findings provide a basis for comparative investigations of nematode kinomes, and might facilitate the identification of Enoplea-specific intervention and diagnostic targets. Importantly, the in silico modeling approach assessed here provides an exciting prospect of being able to identify and classify currently unknown (orphan) kinases, as a foundation for their subsequent structural and functional investigation.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1534/g3.116.032961DOIArticle
http://g3journal.org/content/6/9/2847PublisherArticle
http://g3journal.org/content/6/9/2847/suppl/DC1Related ItemSupplemental Material
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5015942/PubMed CentralArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Sternberg, Paul W.0000-0002-7699-0173
Additional Information:© 2016 Stroehlein et al. Published by the Genetics Society of America. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Manuscript received May 19, 2016; accepted for publication July 7, 2016; published Early Online July 13, 2016. Research funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), Australian Research Council, Wellcome Trust, and The University of Melbourne Business Improvement Program is gratefully acknowledged (R.B.G.). Support from the Australian Academy of Science, the Australian-American Fulbright Commission, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, and Melbourne Water Corporation, as well as the Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative and WormBase (www.wormbase.org), is gratefully acknowledged. P.W.S. acknowledges support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the National Institutes of Health. A.J.S. is a recipient of a Melbourne International Research Scholarship and a Melbourne International Fee Remission Scholarship from the University of Melbourne. N.D.Y. holds an NHMRC Career Development Fellowship.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)UNSPECIFIED
Australian Research CouncilUNSPECIFIED
Wellcome TrustUNSPECIFIED
University of MelbourneUNSPECIFIED
Australian Academy of ScienceUNSPECIFIED
Australian-American Fulbright CommissionUNSPECIFIED
Alexander von Humboldt FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Melbourne Water CorporationUNSPECIFIED
Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative (VLSCI)UNSPECIFIED
WormBaseUNSPECIFIED
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)UNSPECIFIED
NIHUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:Trichinella kinome parasitic worms protein annotation protein kinases
Issue or Number:9
PubMed Central ID:PMC5015942
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20160725-131922343
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160725-131922343
Official Citation:Analyses of Compact Trichinella Kinomes Reveal a MOS-Like Protein Kinase with a Unique N-Terminal Domain Andreas J. Stroehlein, Neil D. Young, Pasi K. Korhonen, Bill C. H. Chang, Paul W. Sternberg, Giuseppe La Rosa, Edoardo Pozio, and Robin B. Gasser G3 September 2016 6:2847-2856; Early Online July 13, 2016, doi:10.1534/g3.116.032961
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:69202
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Ruth Sustaita
Deposited On:25 Jul 2016 21:22
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 10:20

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