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Five Planets Transiting a Ninth Magnitude Star

Vanderburg, Andrew and Becker, Juliette C. and Kristiansen, Martti H. and Bieryla, Allyson and Duev, Dmitry A. and Jensen-Clem, Rebecca and Morton, Timothy D. and Latham, David W. and Adams, Fred C. and Baranec, Christoph and Berlind, Perry and Calkins, Michael L. and Esquerdo, Gilbert A. and Kulkarni, Shrinivas and Law, Nicholas M. and Riddle, Reed and Salama, Maïssa and Schmitt, Allan R. (2016) Five Planets Transiting a Ninth Magnitude Star. Astrophysical Journal Letters, 827 (1). Art. No. L10. ISSN 2041-8205. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160805-093813077

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Abstract

The Kepler mission has revealed a great diversity of planetary systems and architectures, but most of the planets discovered by Kepler orbit faint stars. Using new data from the K2 mission, we present the discovery of a five-planet system transiting a bright (V = 8.9, K = 7.7) star called HIP 41378. HIP 41378 is a slightly metal-poor late F-type star with moderate rotation (v sin i ≃7 km s^(-1)) and lies at a distance of 116 ± 18 pc from Earth. We find that HIP 41378 hosts two sub-Neptune-sized planets orbiting 3.5% outside a 2:1 period commensurability in 15.6 and 31.7 day orbits. In addition, we detect three planets that each transit once during the 75 days spanned by K2 observations. One planet is Neptune-sized in a likely ~160 day orbit, one is sub-Saturn-sized, likely in a ~130 day orbit, and one is a Jupiter-sized planet in a likely ~1 year orbit. We show that these estimates for the orbital periods can be made more precise by taking into account dynamical stability considerations. We also calculate the distribution of stellar reflex velocities expected for this system, and show that it provides a good target for future radial velocity observations. If a precise orbital period can be determined for the outer Jovian planets through future observations, this system will be an excellent candidate for follow-up transit observations to study its atmosphere and measure its oblateness.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.3847/2041-8205/827/1/L10DOIArticle
http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8205/827/1/L10/metaPublisherArticle
https://arxiv.org/abs/1606.08441arXivDiscussion Paper
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Vanderburg, Andrew0000-0001-7246-5438
Becker, Juliette C.0000-0002-7733-4522
Duev, Dmitry A.0000-0001-5060-8733
Jensen-Clem, Rebecca0000-0003-0054-2953
Morton, Timothy D.0000-0002-8537-5711
Latham, David W.0000-0001-9911-7388
Adams, Fred C.0000-0002-8167-1767
Baranec, Christoph0000-0002-1917-9157
Calkins, Michael L.0000-0002-2830-5661
Kulkarni, Shrinivas0000-0001-5390-8563
Law, Nicholas M.0000-0001-9380-6457
Riddle, Reed0000-0002-0387-370X
Additional Information:© 2016 The American Astronomical Society. Received 2016 May 2; accepted 2016 June 27; published 2016 August 4. We thank the anonymous referee for helpful comments on the manuscript. A.V. and J.C.B. are supported by the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, grants No. DGE 1144152 and DGE 1256260, respectively. D.W.L. acknowledges partial support from the Kepler mission under NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX13AB58A with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. C.B. acknowledges support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. This research has made use of NASA's Astrophysics Data System and the NASA Exoplanet Archive, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under the Exoplanet Exploration Program. This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation grant number ACI-1053575. This research was done using resources provided by the Open Science Grid, which is supported by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. The National Geographic Society–Palomar Observatory Sky Atlas (POSS-I) was made by the California Institute of Technology with grants from the National Geographic Society. The Oschin Schmidt Telescope is operated by the California Institute of Technology and Palomar Observatory. This paper includes data collected by the Kepler mission. Funding for the Kepler mission is provided by the NASA Science Mission directorate. Some of the data presented in this paper were obtained from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5–26555. Support for MAST for non–HST data is provided by the NASA Office of Space Science via grant NNX13AC07G and by other grants and contracts. Robo-AO KP is a partnership between the California Institute of Technology, University of Hawaii, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, and the National Central University, Taiwan. Robo-AO KP was supported by a grant from Sudha Murty, Narayan Murthy, and Rohan Murty. The Robo-AO instrument was developed with support from the National Science Foundation under grants AST-0906060, AST-0960343, and AST-1207891, the Mt. Cuba Astronomical Foundation, and by a gift from Samuel Oschin. Based in part on observations at Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO Prop. ID: 15B-3001), which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation. Facilities: Kepler/K2 - , FLWO:1.5 m (TRES) - , KPNO:2.1 m (Robo-AO) - .
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSF Graduate Research FellowshipDGE 1144152
NSF Graduate Research FellowshipDGE 1256260
NASANNX13AB58A
Alfred P. Sloan FoundationUNSPECIFIED
NSFACI-1053575
Department of Energy (DOE)UNSPECIFIED
National Geographic SocietyUNSPECIFIED
NASANAS5-26555
NASANNX13AC07G
NSFAST-0906060
NSFAST-0960343
NSFAST-1207891
Mt. Cuba Astronomical FoundationUNSPECIFIED
NASA/JPL/CaltechUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:planets and satellites: detection – planets and satellites: gaseous planets
Issue or Number:1
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20160805-093813077
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160805-093813077
Official Citation:Andrew Vanderburg et al 2016 ApJ 827 L10
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:69467
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:05 Aug 2016 17:21
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 10:22

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