CaltechAUTHORS
  A Caltech Library Service

Introduction: Femtochemistry

Dantus, Marcos and Zewail, Ahmed (2004) Introduction: Femtochemistry. Chemical Reviews, 104 (4). pp. 1717-1718. ISSN 0009-2665. doi:10.1021/cr020690k. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160817-092917194

Full text is not posted in this repository. Consult Related URLs below.

Use this Persistent URL to link to this item: https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160817-092917194

Abstract

Only a few years after femtochemistry was first established as a field of research did we witness an explosion of research in all phases of matter and in biological systems. The reason behind this explosion is fundamentals-chemical bonds form and break on the femtosecond time scale, and on this scale of time we can freeze the transition states at configurations never seen before. Even if there is no reactants-to-products transformations - physical changes - one is observing the most elementary of all molecular processes. On a time scale shorter than the vibrational and rotational periods, the ensemble behaves coherently as a single-molecule trajectory.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr020690kDOIArticle
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/cr020690kPublisherArticle
Additional Information:© 2004 American Chemical Society.
Issue or Number:4
DOI:10.1021/cr020690k
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20160817-092917194
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20160817-092917194
Official Citation:Introduction:  Femtochemistry Marcos Dantus and Ahmed Zewail Chemical Reviews 2004 104 (4), 1717-1718 DOI: 10.1021/cr020690k
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:69697
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Ruth Sustaita
Deposited On:17 Aug 2016 16:54
Last Modified:11 Nov 2021 04:18

Repository Staff Only: item control page