CaltechAUTHORS
  A Caltech Library Service

How to make a molecular light switch sequence-specific: tethering of an oligonucleotide to a dipyridophenazine complex of ruthenium (II)

Jenkins, Yonchu and Barton, Jacqueline (1993) How to make a molecular light switch sequence-specific: tethering of an oligonucleotide to a dipyridophenazine complex of ruthenium (II). In: Advances in Fluorescence Sensing Technology. Proceedings of SPIE. No.1885. Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers , Bellingham, WA, pp. 129-137. ISBN 9780819411129. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20161018-141749842

[img] PDF - Published Version
See Usage Policy.

609Kb

Use this Persistent URL to link to this item: https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20161018-141749842

Abstract

Considerable attention has been given recently to the design and development of nonradiative methods of recognizing DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Earlier, we reported that Ru(bpy)_2dppz^(2+)(bpy equals 2,2'-bipyridine, dppz equals dipyrido[3,2:a-2',3':c]phenazine) shows no luminescence in aqueous solution, but upon intercalation into double-helical DNA, bright photoluminescence is observed (A. E. Friedman, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1990, 112, 4960). Based upon this observation, a sequence-specific molecular light switch has been designed in which a dppz complex of ruthenium(II) is tethered onto an oligonucleotide. An oligonucleotide modified at its 5 foot end has been constructed by coupling the sequence 5'-H_2N(CH_2)_6AGTGCCAAGCTTGCA-3' to Ru(phen')_2dppz^(2+) (phen' equals 5-amido-glutaric acid-1,10-phenanthroline). Like the parent complex Ru(bpy)_2dppz^(2+), the single-stranded metal-oligonucleotide conjugate shows little detectable luminescence in aqueous solution. Addition of the complementary strand results in intense photoluminescence; time-resolved studies show that the emission is biphasic with excited state lifetimes of 500 (60%) and 110 (40%) ns. As expected, addition of a non- complementary strand produces no luminescence enhancement over that of the single-stranded metal-oligonucleotide. These results demonstrate that this oligonucleotide derivatized metal complex can be used to recognize and target specific sequences on DNA, a valuable feature which may lead to interesting and novel applications in hybridization technology.


Item Type:Book Section
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.144704DOIArticle
http://proceedings.spiedigitallibrary.org/proceeding.aspx?articleid=1007496PublisherArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Barton, Jacqueline0000-0001-9883-1600
Additional Information:© 1993 SPIE. We are grateful to the NIH (GM33309 and an NRSA for Y.J.) and the Ralph M. Parsons Foundation for their financial support.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NIHGM33309
NIH Predoctoral FellowshipUNSPECIFIED
Ralph M. Parsons FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Series Name:Proceedings of SPIE
Issue or Number:1885
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20161018-141749842
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20161018-141749842
Official Citation:Yonchu Jenkins ; Jacqueline K. Barton; How to make a molecular light switch sequence-specific: tethering of an oligonucleotide to a dipyridophenazine complex of ruthenium (II). Proc. SPIE 1885, Advances in Fluorescence Sensing Technology, 129 (May 18, 1993); doi:10.1117/12.144704
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:71232
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:18 Oct 2016 22:07
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 16:05

Repository Staff Only: item control page