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How do we know the minds of others? Domain-specificity, simulation, and enactive social cognition

Adolphs, Ralph (2006) How do we know the minds of others? Domain-specificity, simulation, and enactive social cognition. Brain Research, 1079 (1). pp. 25-35. ISSN 0006-8993. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20170209-105844746

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Abstract

In what ways, and to what extent, is social cognition distinguished from cognition in general? And how do data from cognitive neuroscience speak to this question? I review recent findings that argue social cognition may indeed be specialized, and at multiple levels. One particularly interesting respect in which social cognition differs from the rest of cognition is in its close interaction with the social environment. We actively probe other people in order to make inferences about what is going on in their minds (e.g., by asking them questions, and directing our gaze onto them), and we use the minds of other people as a collective resource. Experiments from our own laboratory point to the amygdala as one structure that is critically involved in such processes.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2005.12.127DOIArticle
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006899306000588PublisherArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Adolphs, Ralph0000-0002-8053-9692
Additional Information:© 2006 Elsevier B.V. Accepted 30 December 2005, Available online 28 February 2006. Supported in part by grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, the Cure Autism Now Foundation, and the Pfeiffer Research Foundation.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)UNSPECIFIED
Cure Autism Now FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Pfeiffer Research FoundationUNSPECIFIED
NIHUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:Social cognition; Emotion; Simulation; Theory of mind
Issue or Number:1
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20170209-105844746
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20170209-105844746
Official Citation:Ralph Adolphs, How do we know the minds of others? Domain-specificity, simulation, and enactive social cognition, Brain Research, Volume 1079, Issue 1, 24 March 2006, Pages 25-35, ISSN 0006-8993, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2005.12.127. (//www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006899306000588)
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:74192
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Ruth Sustaita
Deposited On:09 Feb 2017 19:08
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 16:35

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