CaltechAUTHORS
  A Caltech Library Service

Climbing favours the tripod gait over alternative faster insect gaits

Ramdya, Pavan and Thandiackal, Robin and Cherney, Raphael and Asselborn, Thibault and Benton, Richard and Ijspeert, Auke Jan and Floreano, Dario (2017) Climbing favours the tripod gait over alternative faster insect gaits. Nature Communications, 8 . Art. No. 14494. ISSN 2041-1723. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20170317-110914438

[img] PDF - Published Version
Creative Commons Attribution.

1183Kb
[img] PDF (Supplementary Figures and Tables) - Supplemental Material
Creative Commons Attribution.

1647Kb
[img] Video (QuickTime) (Supplementary Movie 1) - Supplemental Material
Creative Commons Attribution.

1923Kb
[img] Video (QuickTime) (Supplementary Movie 2) - Supplemental Material
Creative Commons Attribution.

4Mb
[img] Video (QuickTime) (Supplementary Movie 3) - Supplemental Material
Creative Commons Attribution.

13Mb
[img] Video (QuickTime) (Supplementary Movie 4) - Supplemental Material
Creative Commons Attribution.

2220Kb
[img] Video (QuickTime) (Supplementary Movie 5) - Supplemental Material
Creative Commons Attribution.

18Mb
[img] MS Excel (Supplementary Data 1. Raw data for insect model gait optimization and hexapod robot experiments) - Supplemental Material
Creative Commons Attribution.

28Kb

Use this Persistent URL to link to this item: https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20170317-110914438

Abstract

To escape danger or catch prey, running vertebrates rely on dynamic gaits with minimal ground contact. By contrast, most insects use a tripod gait that maintains at least three legs on the ground at any given time. One prevailing hypothesis for this difference in fast locomotor strategies is that tripod locomotion allows insects to rapidly navigate three-dimensional terrain. To test this, we computationally discovered fast locomotor gaits for a model based on Drosophila melanogaster. Indeed, the tripod gait emerges to the exclusion of many other possible gaits when optimizing fast upward climbing with leg adhesion. By contrast, novel two-legged bipod gaits are fastest on flat terrain without adhesion in the model and in a hexapod robot. Intriguingly, when adhesive leg structures in real Drosophila are covered, animals exhibit atypical bipod-like leg coordination. We propose that the requirement to climb vertical terrain may drive the prevalence of the tripod gait over faster alternative gaits with minimal ground contact.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14494DOIArticle
http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms14494PublisherArticle
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5321742/PubMed CentralArticle
Additional Information:© 2017 The Author(s). This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Received: 23 July 2016. Accepted: 04 January 2017. Published online: 17 February 2017. We thank Robert J. Full, Silvia Gruhn, Philip Holmes and members of the Floreano laboratory for helpful comments on an early version of the manuscript. P.R. was supported by a Human Frontier Science Program Long-term Fellowship (LT000057/2009) and a Swiss National Science Foundation Advanced.Postdoc Mobility grant (P300P3_158511). R.T. was supported by a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (CR2312_140714). R.B. acknowledges support from European Research Council Starting Independent Researcher and Consolidator Grants (205202 and 615094), and the Swiss National Science Foundation (31003A_140869). A.I. and D.F. acknowledge support from the Swiss National Science Foundation and the National Center for Competence in Robotics (NCCR). Pavan Ramdya & Robin Thandiackal: These authors contributed equally to this work. Author Contributions: P.R. conceived the project. P.R., R.T., R.C. and T.A. carried out experiments and analysis with input from R.B., A.J.I. and D.F. P.R. wrote the paper with input from all co-authors. The authors declare no competing financial interests. Data availability: Gait data are provided in Supplementary Data. The remaining Webots, robotics and D. melanogaster data sets and code are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Human Frontier Science ProgramLT000057/2009
Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF)P300P3_158511
Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF)CR2312_140714
European Research Council (ERC)205202
European Research Council (ERC)615094
Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF)31003A_140869
National Center for Competence in Robotics (Switzerland)UNSPECIFIED
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20170317-110914438
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20170317-110914438
Official Citation:Ramdya, P. et al. Climbing favours the tripod gait over alternative faster insect gaits. Nat. Commun. 8, 14494 doi: 10.1038/ncomms14494 (2017).
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:75203
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: George Porter
Deposited On:17 Mar 2017 20:47
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 16:47

Repository Staff Only: item control page