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HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b: Two Transiting Inflated Hot Jupiters and Observational Evidence for the Reinflation of Close-In Giant Planets

Hartman, J. D. and Howard, A. W. and Fulton, B. J. (2016) HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b: Two Transiting Inflated Hot Jupiters and Observational Evidence for the Reinflation of Close-In Giant Planets. Astronomical Journal, 152 (6). Art. No. 182. ISSN 0004-6256. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20170620-095816248

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Abstract

We present the discovery of the transiting exoplanets HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, with orbital periods of 2.6055 and 2.9721 days, masses of 0.527 ± 0.083 M_J and 0.783 ± 0.057 M_J, and inflated radii of 1.89 ± 0.13 R_J and 1.59^(+0.16)_(-0.10) R_J, respectively. They orbit moderately bright (v = 13.145 ± 0.029 and v = 12.993 ± 0.052) stars of mass 1.212 ± 0.050 M⊙ and 1.255^(+0.107)_(-0.054) M⊙. The stars are at the main-sequence turnoff. While it is well known that the radii of close-in giant planets are correlated with their equilibrium temperatures, whether or not the radii of planets increase in time as their hosts evolve and become more luminous is an open question. Looking at the broader sample of well-characterized close-in transiting giant planets, we find that there is a statistically significant correlation between planetary radii and the fractional ages of their host stars, with a false-alarm probability of only 0.0041%. We find that the correlation between the radii of planets and the fractional ages of their hosts is fully explained by the known correlation between planetary radii and their present-day equilibrium temperatures; however, if the zero-age main-sequence equilibrium temperature is used in place of the present-day equilibrium temperature, then a correlation with age must also be included to explain the planetary radii. This suggests that, after contracting during the pre-main-sequence, close-in giant planets are reinflated over time due to the increasing level of irradiation received from their host stars. Prior theoretical work indicates that such a dynamic response to irradiation requires a significant fraction of the incident energy to be deposited deep within the planetary interiors.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.3847/0004-6256/152/6/182DOIArticle
http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/0004-6256/152/6/182/metaPublisherArticle
https://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02767arXivDiscussion Paper
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Hartman, J. D.0000-0001-8732-6166
Howard, A. W.0000-0001-8638-0320
Fulton, B. J.0000-0003-3504-5316
Additional Information:© 2016 The American Astronomical Society. Received 2016 July 15; revised 2016 September 7; accepted 2016 September 9; published 2016 November 23. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A289Hr, A245Hr) and NASA (N029Hr, N154Hr, N130Hr, N133Hr, N169Hr, N186Hr). Based on observations obtained with the Tillinghast Reflector 1.5 m telescope and the 1.2 m telescope, both operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in Arizona. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated by the Nordic Optical Telescope Scientific Association at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, Spain, of the Intituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Based on observations made with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93 m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, CNRS/AMU), France (programs 15A.PNP.HEBR and 15B.PNP.HEBR). Data presented herein were obtained at the WIYN Observatory from telescope time allocated to NN-EXPLORE through the scientific partnership of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. This work was supported by a NASA WIYN PI Data Award, administered by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute. HATNet operations have been funded by NASA grants NNG04GN74G and NNX13AJ15G. Follow-up of HATNet targets has been partially supported through NSF grant AST-1108686. G.Á.B., Z.C., and K.P. acknowledge partial support from NASA grant NNX09AB29G. J.H. acknowledges support from NASA grant NNX14AE87G. K.P. acknowledges support from NASA grant NNX13AQ62G. We acknowledge partial support also from the Kepler Mission under NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC2-1390 (DWL, PI). A.S. is supported by the European Union under a Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship for Career Development with reference FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IEF, number 627202. Part of this work was supported by Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT, Portugal, ref. UID/FIS/04434/2013) through national funds and by FEDER through COMPETE2020 (ref. POCI-01-0145-FEDER-007672). Data presented in this paper are based on observations obtained at the HAT station at the Submillimeter Array of SAO and the HAT station at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory of SAO. This research has made use of the NASA Exoplanet Archive, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under the Exoplanet Exploration Program. Data presented herein were obtained at the WIYN Observatory from telescope time allocated to NN-EXPLORE through the scientific partnership of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. This work was supported by a NASA WIYN PI Data Award, administered by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute. We gratefully acknowledge R. W. Noyes for his many contributions to the HATNet transit survey, and we also gratefully acknowledge contributions from J. Johnson and from G. Marcy to the collection and reduction of the Keck/HIRES observations presented here. The authors wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community. We are most fortunate to have the opportunity to conduct observations from this mountain.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NASANNG04GN74G
NASANNX13AJ15G
NSFAST-1108686
NASANNX09AB29G
NASANNX14AE87G
NASANNX13AQ62G
NASANCC2-1390
Marie Curie Fellowship627202
Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT)UID/FIS/04434/2013
Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT)POCI-01-0145-FEDER-007672
Subject Keywords:stars: individual (HAT-P-65, GSC 1111-00383, HAT-P-66, GSC 3814-00307) – techniques: photometric – techniques: spectroscopic
Issue or Number:6
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20170620-095816248
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20170620-095816248
Official Citation:J. D. Hartman et al 2016 AJ 152 182
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:78371
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:21 Jun 2017 19:50
Last Modified:09 Mar 2020 13:18

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