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Radio Emission from the Exoplanetary System ε Eridani

Bastian, T. S. and Villadsen, J. and Maps, A. and Hallinan, G. and Beasley, A. J. (2018) Radio Emission from the Exoplanetary System ε Eridani. Astrophysical Journal, 857 (2). Art. No. 133. ISSN 1538-4357. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aab3cb. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20170719-171517956

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Abstract

As part of a wider search for radio emission from nearby systems known or suspected to contain extrasolar planets, ε Eridani was observed by the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in the 2–4 GHz and 4–8 GHz frequency bands. In addition, as part of a separate survey of thermal emission from solar-like stars, ε Eri was observed in the 8–12 GHz and the 12–18 GHz bands of the VLA. Quasi-steady continuum radio emission from ε Eri was detected in the three high-frequency bands at levels ranging from 67 to 83 μJy. No significant variability is seen in the quasi-steady emission. The emission in the 2–4 GHz emission, however, is shown to be the result of a circularly polarized (up to 50%) radio pulse or flare of a few minutes in duration that occurred at the beginning of the observation. We consider the astrometric position of the radio source in each frequency band relative to the expected position of the K2V star and the purported planet. The quasi-steady radio emission at frequencies ≥8 GHz is consistent with a stellar origin. The quality of the 4–8 GHz astrometry provides no meaningful constraint on the origin of the emission. The location of the 2–4 GHz radio pulse is >2.5σ from the star; however, based on the ephemeris of Benedict et al., it is not consistent with the expected location of the planet either. If the radio pulse has a planetary origin, then either the planetary ephemeris is incorrect or the emission originates from another planet.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/aab3cbDOIArticle
http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/aab3cb/metaPublisherArticle
http://arxiv.org/abs/1706.07012arXivDiscussion Paper
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Bastian, T. S.0000-0002-0713-0604
Villadsen, J.0000-0003-3924-243X
Hallinan, G.0000-0002-7083-4049
Additional Information:© 2018 The American Astronomical Society. Received 2017 June 21; revised 2018 February 22; accepted 2018 February 28; published 2018 April 24. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. A.M. was supported by NSF grant AST-1358169 to Associated Universities, Inc., in support of the Research Experience for Undergraduates summer student program. This work utilized data acquired by VLA programs 13A-471, 15B-326, and 16A-078. We thank the referee for constructive comments that improved the paper.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSFAST-1358169
Associated Universities, Inc.UNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:planetary systems – planets and satellites: detection – radio continuum: stars – stars: activity – stars: solar-type
Issue or Number:2
DOI:10.3847/1538-4357/aab3cb
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20170719-171517956
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20170719-171517956
Official Citation:T. S. Bastian et al 2018 ApJ 857 133
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:79219
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Joy Painter
Deposited On:20 Jul 2017 18:45
Last Modified:15 Nov 2021 17:46

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