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The role of empathy in experiencing vicarious anxiety

Shu, Jocelyn and Hassell, Samuel and Weber, Jochen and Ochsner, Kevin N. and Mobbs, Dean (2017) The role of empathy in experiencing vicarious anxiety. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 146 (8). pp. 1164-1188. ISSN 0096-3445. doi:10.1037/xge0000335. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20170807-084553785

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Abstract

With depictions of others facing threats common in the media, the experience of vicarious anxiety may be prevalent in the general population. However, the phenomenon of vicarious anxiety—the experience of anxiety in response to observing others expressing anxiety—and the interpersonal mechanisms underlying it have not been fully investigated in prior research. In 4 studies, we investigate the role of empathy in experiencing vicarious anxiety, using film clips depicting target victims facing threats. In Studies 1 and 2, trait emotional empathy was associated with greater self-reported anxiety when observing target victims, and with perceiving greater anxiety to be experienced by the targets. Study 3 extended these findings by demonstrating that trait empathic concern—the tendency to feel concern and compassion for others—was associated with experiencing vicarious anxiety, whereas trait personal distress—the tendency to experience distress in stressful situations—was not. Study 4 manipulated state empathy to establish a causal relationship between empathy and experience of vicarious anxiety. Participants who took an empathic perspective when observing target victims, as compared to those who took an objective perspective using reappraisal-based strategies, reported experiencing greater anxiety, risk-aversion, and sleep disruption the following night. These results highlight the impact of one’s social environment on experiencing anxiety, particularly for those who are highly empathic. In addition, these findings have implications for extending basic models of anxiety to incorporate interpersonal processes, understanding the role of empathy in social learning, and potential applications for therapeutic contexts.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xge0000335 DOIArticle
http://content.apa.org/record/2017-26549-001PublisherArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Mobbs, Dean0000-0003-1175-3772
Additional Information:© 2017 American Psychological Association.
Issue or Number:8
DOI:10.1037/xge0000335
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20170807-084553785
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20170807-084553785
Official Citation:Shu, J., Hassell, S., Weber, J., Ochsner, K. N., & Mobbs, D. (2017). The role of empathy in experiencing vicarious anxiety. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 146(8), 1164-1188. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xge0000335
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:79838
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:07 Aug 2017 17:08
Last Modified:15 Nov 2021 17:50

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