CaltechAUTHORS
  A Caltech Library Service

Fully integrated wearable sensor arrays for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis

Gao, Wei and Emaminejad, Sam and Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin and Challa, Samyuktha and Chen, Kevin and Peck, Austin and Fahad, Hossain M. and Ota, Hiroki and Shiraki, Hiroshi and Kiriya, Daisuke and Lien, Der-Hsien and Brooks, George A. and Davis, Ronald W. and Javey, Ali (2016) Fully integrated wearable sensor arrays for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis. Nature, 529 (7587). pp. 509-514. ISSN 0028-0836. PMCID PMC4996079. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20170922-082651286

[img] PDF - Accepted Version
See Usage Policy.

4Mb
[img] PDF - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

152Kb

Use this Persistent URL to link to this item: https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20170922-082651286

Abstract

Wearable sensor technologies are essential to the realization of personalized medicine through continuously monitoring an individual’s state of health. Sampling human sweat, which is rich in physiological information, could enable non-invasive monitoring. Previously reported sweat-based and other non-invasive biosensors either can only monitor a single analyte at a time or lack on-site signal processing circuitry and sensor calibration mechanisms for accurate analysis of the physiological state. Given the complexity of sweat secretion, simultaneous and multiplexed screening of target biomarkers is critical and requires full system integration to ensure the accuracy of measurements. Here we present a mechanically flexible and fully integrated (that is, no external analysis is needed) sensor array for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis, which simultaneously and selectively measures sweat metabolites (such as glucose and lactate) and electrolytes (such as sodium and potassium ions), as well as the skin temperature (to calibrate the response of the sensors). Our work bridges the technological gap between signal transduction, conditioning (amplification and filtering), processing and wireless transmission in wearable biosensors by merging plastic-based sensors that interface with the skin with silicon integrated circuits consolidated on a flexible circuit board for complex signal processing. This application could not have been realized using either of these technologies alone owing to their respective inherent limitations. The wearable system is used to measure the detailed sweat profile of human subjects engaged in prolonged indoor and outdoor physical activities, and to make a real-time assessment of the physiological state of the subjects. This platform enables a wide range of personalized diagnostic and physiological monitoring applications.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature16521DOIArticle
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v529/n7587/full/nature16521.htmlPublisherArticle
http://rdcu.be/v63YPublisherFree ReadCube access
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4996079PubMed CentralArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Gao, Wei0000-0002-8503-4562
Chen, Kevin0000-0002-6726-6132
Kiriya, Daisuke0000-0003-0270-3888
Javey, Ali0000-0001-7214-7931
Additional Information:© 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited. Received 26 June 2015 Accepted 23 November 2015 Published online 27 January 2016. The sensor design, characterization and testing aspects of this work were supported by the Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, and National Institutes of Health grant number P01 HG000205. The sensor fabrication was performed in the Electronic Materials (E-MAT) laboratory funded by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Material Sciences and Engineering Division of the US Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-05CH11231. K.C. acknowledges funding from the NSF Nanomanufacturing Systems for mobile Computing and Energy Technologies (NASCENT) Center. H.O. acknowledges support from a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellowship. We thank J. Bullock, C. M. Sutter-Fella, H. W. W. Nyein, Z. Shahpar, M. Zhou, E. Wu and W. Chen for their help. These authors contributed equally to this work Wei Gao & Sam Emaminejad. Author Contributions: W.G., S.E. and A.J. conceived the idea and designed the experiments. W.G., S.E., H.Y.Y.N. and S.C. led the experiments (with assistance from K.C., A.P., H.M.F., H.O., H.S., H.O., D.K., D.-H.L.). W.G., S.E., A.P., G.A.B., R.W.D. and A.J. contributed to data analysis and interpretation. W.G., S.E., H.Y.Y.N., G.A.B. and A.J. wrote the paper and all authors provided feedback. The authors declare no competing financial interests.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of California, BerkeleyUNSPECIFIED
NIHP01 HG000205
Department of Energy (DOE)DE-AC02-05CH11231
NSFUNSPECIFIED
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS)UNSPECIFIED
Issue or Number:7587
PubMed Central ID:PMC4996079
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20170922-082651286
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20170922-082651286
Official Citation:Fully integrated wearable sensor arrays for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis Wei Gao, Sam Emaminejad, Hnin Yin Yin Nyein, Samyuktha Challa, Kevin Chen, Austin Peck, Hossain M. Fahad, Hiroki Ota, Hiroshi Shiraki, Daisuke Kiriya, Der-Hsien Lien, George A. Brooks, Ronald W. Davis & Ali Javey Nature 529, 509–514 (28 January 2016) doi:10.1038/nature16521
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:81729
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Ruth Sustaita
Deposited On:22 Sep 2017 16:56
Last Modified:09 Mar 2020 13:18

Repository Staff Only: item control page