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Effects of transients in LIGO suspensions on searches for gravitational waves

Walker, M. and McIver, J. and Abbott, B. P. and Abbott, R. and Adhikari, R. X. and Anderson, S. B. and Ananyeva, A. and Appert, S. and Arai, K. and Billingsley, G. and Biscans, S and Bork, R. and Brooks, A. F. and Coyne, D. C. and Etzel, T. and Gushwa, K. E. and Gustafson, E. K. and Hall, E. D. and Heptonstall, A. W. and Korth, W. Z. and Maros, E. and Matichard, F. and McIntyre, G. and Quintero, E. A. and Reitze, D. H. and Robertson, N. A. and Rollins, J. G. and Sanchez, E. J. and Taylor, R. and Torrie, C. I. and Vajente, G. and Wipf, C. C. and Yamamoto, H. and Zhang, L. and Zucker, M. E. and Zweizig, J. (2017) Effects of transients in LIGO suspensions on searches for gravitational waves. Review of Scientific Instruments, 88 (12). Art. No. 124501. ISSN 0034-6748. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20171201-161141529

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Abstract

This paper presents an analysis of the transient behavior of the Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) suspensions used to seismically isolate the optics. We have characterized the transients in the longitudinal motion of the quadruple suspensions during Advanced LIGO’s first observing run. Propagation of transients between stages is consistent with modeled transfer functions, such that transient motion originating at the top of the suspension chain is significantly reduced in amplitude at the test mass. We find that there are transients seen by the longitudinal motion monitors of quadruple suspensions, but they are not significantly correlated with transient motion above the noise floor in the gravitational wave strain data, and therefore do not present a dominant source of background noise in the searches for transient gravitational wave signals. Using the suspension transfer functions, we compared the transients in a week of gravitational wave strain data with transients from a quadruple suspension. Of the strain transients between 10 and 60 Hz, 84% are loud enough that they would have appeared above the sensor noise in the top stage quadruple suspension monitors if they had originated at that stage at the same frequencies. We find no significant temporal correlation with the suspension transients in that stage, so we can rule out suspension motion originating at the top stage as the cause of those transients. However, only 3.2% of the gravitational wave strain transients are loud enough that they would have been seen by the second stage suspension sensors, and none of them are above the sensor noise levels of the penultimate stage. Therefore, we cannot eliminate the possibility of transient noise in the detectors originating in the intermediate stages of the suspension below the sensing noise.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5000264DOIArticle
http://aip.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/1.5000264PublisherArticle
https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.04701arXivDiscussion Paper
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Walker, M.0000-0002-7176-6914
Adhikari, R. X.0000-0002-5731-5076
Billingsley, G.0000-0002-4141-2744
Korth, W. Z.0000-0003-3527-1348
Zucker, M. E.0000-0002-2544-1596
Zweizig, J.0000-0002-1521-3397
Additional Information:© 2017 Published by AIP Publishing. Received 14 August 2017; accepted 2 November 2017; published online 1 December 2017. LSU authors acknowledge the support of the United States National Science Foundation (NSF) with Grant Nos. PHY-1505779, 1205882, and 1104371. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the NSF for the construction and operation of the LIGO Laboratory and Advanced LIGO, as well as the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) of the United Kingdom, the Max-Planck-Society (MPS), and the State of Niedersachsen/Germany for support of the construction of Advanced LIGO and construction and operation of the GEO600 detector. Additional support for Advanced LIGO was provided by the Australian Research Council. The authors also gratefully acknowledge the support of LSC related research by these agencies as well as by the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research of India, Department of Science and Technology, India, Science and Engineering Research Board (SERB), India, Ministry of Human Resource Development, India, the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare of Italy, the Spanish Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, the Vicepresidència i Conselleria d’Innovació, Recerca i Turisme and the Conselleria d’Educació i Universitat del Govern de les Illes Balears, the European Union, the Royal Society, the Scottish Funding Council, the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA), the National Research Foundation of Korea, Industry Canada and the Province of Ontario through the Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation, the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council Canada, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, the Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology, and Innovation, International Center for Theoretical Physics South American Institute for Fundamental Research (ICTP-SAIFR), Russian Foundation for Basic Research, the Leverhulme Trust, the Research Corporation, Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), Taiwan, and the Kavli Foundation. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the NSF, STFC, MPS, and the State of Niedersachsen/Germany for provision of computational resources.
Group:LIGO
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSFPHY-1505779
NSFPHY-1205882
NSFPHY-1104371
Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC)UNSPECIFIED
Max-Planck-SocietyUNSPECIFIED
State of Niedersachsen/GermanyUNSPECIFIED
Australian Research CouncilUNSPECIFIED
Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (India)UNSPECIFIED
Department of Science and Technology (India)UNSPECIFIED
Science and Engineering Research Board (SERB)UNSPECIFIED
Ministry of Human Resource Development (India)UNSPECIFIED
Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)UNSPECIFIED
Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (MINECO)UNSPECIFIED
Vicepresidència i Conselleria d’Innovació, Recerca i TurismeUNSPECIFIED
Conselleria d’Educació i Universitat del Govern de les Illes BalearsUNSPECIFIED
European UnionUNSPECIFIED
Royal SocietyUNSPECIFIED
Scottish Funding CouncilUNSPECIFIED
Scottish Universities Physics AllianceUNSPECIFIED
Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA)UNSPECIFIED
National Research Foundation of KoreaUNSPECIFIED
Industry CanadaUNSPECIFIED
Ontario Ministry of Economic Development and InnovationUNSPECIFIED
Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) UNSPECIFIED
Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR)UNSPECIFIED
Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, Inovação e ComunicaçãoUNSPECIFIED
International Center for Theoretical Physics South American Institute for Fundamental Research (ICTP-SAIFR)UNSPECIFIED
Russian Foundation for Basic ResearchUNSPECIFIED
Leverhulme TrustUNSPECIFIED
Research CorporationUNSPECIFIED
Ministry of Science and Technology (Taipei)UNSPECIFIED
Kavli FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:Gravitational waves; Acoustic noise; Interferometers; Signal processing; Black holes
Issue or Number:12
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20171201-161141529
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20171201-161141529
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:83643
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:02 Dec 2017 04:35
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 19:09

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