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Measurement of Circumstellar Disk Sizes in the Upper Scorpius OB Association with ALMA

Barenfeld, Scott A. and Carpenter, John M. and Sargent, Anneila I. and Isella, Andrea and Ricci, Luca (2017) Measurement of Circumstellar Disk Sizes in the Upper Scorpius OB Association with ALMA. Astrophysical Journal, 851 (2). Art. No. 85. ISSN 1538-4357. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20171215-095223826

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Abstract

We present detailed modeling of the spatial distributions of gas and dust in 57 circumstellar disks in the Upper Scorpius OB Association observed with ALMA at submillimeter wavelengths. We fit power-law models to the dust surface density and CO J = 3–2 surface brightness to measure the radial extent of dust and gas in these disks. We found that these disks are extremely compact: the 25 highest signal-to-noise disks have a median dust outer radius of 21 au, assuming an R^(-1) dust surface density profile. Our lack of CO detections in the majority of our sample is consistent with these small disk sizes assuming the dust and CO share the same spatial distribution. Of seven disks in our sample with well-constrained dust and CO radii, four appear to be more extended in CO, although this may simply be due to the higher optical depth of the CO. Comparison of the Upper Sco results with recent analyses of disks in Taurus, Ophiuchus, and Lupus suggests that the dust disks in Upper Sco may be approximately three times smaller in size than their younger counterparts, although we caution that a more uniform analysis of the data across all regions is needed. We discuss the implications of these results for disk evolution.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/aa989dDOIArticle
http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/aa989dPublisherArticle
https://arxiv.org/abs/1711.04045arXivDiscussion Paper
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Barenfeld, Scott A.0000-0001-5222-6851
Carpenter, John M.0000-0003-2251-0602
Sargent, Anneila I.0000-0002-4633-5098
Isella, Andrea0000-0001-8061-2207
Additional Information:© 2017. The American Astronomical Society. Received 2017 June 30. Accepted 2017 November 4. Published 2017 December 15. We thank the referee and statistics editor for their useful comments, which improved this manuscript. We are grateful to the ALMA staff for their assistance in the data reduction. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. This paper makes use of the following ALMA data: ADS/JAO.ALMA#2011.0.00966.S and ADS/JAO.ALMA#2013.1.00395.S. ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA), and NINS (Japan), together with NRC (Canada) and NSC and ASIAA (Taiwan), in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. The Joint ALMA Observatory is operated by ESO, AUI/NRAO, and NAOJ. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under grant No. DGE1144469. S.A.B. acknowledges support from the NSF grant No. AST-1140063. J.M.C. acknowledges support from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under grant No. 15XRP15_20140 issued through the Exoplanets Research Progam. A.I. acknowledges support from the NSF grant No. AST-1535809 and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration grant No. NNX15AB06G. This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation. This publication makes use of data products from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, which is a joint project of the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This research has made use of the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This work is based [in part] on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.
Group:Astronomy Department
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSF Graduate Research FellowshipDGE-1144469
NSFAST-1140063
NASA15XRP15_20140
NSFAST-1535809
NASANNX15AB06G
NASA/JPL/CaltechUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:open clusters and associations: individual (Upper Scorpius OB1) ; planetary systems; protoplanetary disks; stars: pre-main sequence
Issue or Number:2
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20171215-095223826
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20171215-095223826
Official Citation:Scott A. Barenfeld et al 2017 ApJ 851 85
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:83940
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: George Porter
Deposited On:15 Dec 2017 21:45
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 19:12

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