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Reflected glory and failure: the role of the medial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum in self vs other relevance during advice-giving outcomes

Mobbs, Dean and Hagan, Cindy C. and Yu, Rongjun and Takahashi, Hidehiko and FeldmanHall, Oriel and Calder, Andrew J. and Dalgleish, Tim (2015) Reflected glory and failure: the role of the medial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum in self vs other relevance during advice-giving outcomes. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 10 (10). pp. 1323-1328. ISSN 1749-5016. PMCID PMC4590531. doi:10.1093/scan/nsv020. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20180306-074140131

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Abstract

Despite the risks, people enjoy giving advice. One explanation is that giving beneficial advice can result in reflected glory, ego boosts or reputation enhancement. However, giving poor advice can be socially harmful (being perceived as incompetent or untrustworthy). In both circumstances, we have a vested interest in the advice follower's success or failure, especially when it reflects specifically on us compared with when it is diffused between multiple advisors. We examined these dynamics using an Advisor-Advisee Game, where subjects acted as an Advisor to a confederate Advisee who selected one of the three options when trying to win money: accept the subject's advice, accept the advice of a second confederate Advisor or accept both Advisors' advice. Results showed that having one's advice accepted, compared with being rejected, resulted in activity in the ventral striatum--a core reward area. Furthermore, the ventral striatum was only active when the subject's advice led to the advisee winning, and not when the advisee won based on the confederate's advice. Finally, the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) was more active when the Advisee won or lost money based solely on the subject's advice compared with when the second Advisor's advice was accepted. One explanation for these findings is that the MPFC monitors self-relevant social information, while the ventral striatum is active when others accept advice and when their success leads to reflected glory.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsv020DOIArticle
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4590531/PubMed CentralArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Mobbs, Dean0000-0003-1175-3772
Hagan, Cindy C.0000-0002-4576-7120
Yu, Rongjun0000-0003-0123-1524
Additional Information:© 2015 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits non-commercial reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Received 3 June 2014; Revised 2 February 2015; Accepted 11 February 2015. Advance Access publication 19 February 2015. We thank Jason Stretton for his help with data analysis. This work was funded by the UK Medical Research Council (MC_US_A060_0017).
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Medical Research Council (UK)MC_US_A060_0017
Subject Keywords:advice giving, reward, reflected glory, self-relevance, medial prefrontal cortex
Issue or Number:10
PubMed Central ID:PMC4590531
DOI:10.1093/scan/nsv020
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20180306-074140131
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20180306-074140131
Official Citation:Dean Mobbs, Cindy C. Hagan, Rongjun Yu, Hidehiko Takahashi, Oriel FeldmanHall, Andrew J. Calder, Tim Dalgleish; Reflected glory and failure: the role of the medial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum in self vs other relevance during advice-giving outcomes , Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, Volume 10, Issue 10, 1 October 2015, Pages 1323–1328, https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsv020
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:85119
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By:INVALID USER
Deposited On:06 Mar 2018 18:31
Last Modified:15 Nov 2021 20:25

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