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Capicua regulates neural stem cell proliferation and lineage specification through control of Ets factors

Ahmad, Sheikh Tanveer and Rogers, Alexandra D. and Chen, Myra J. and Dixit, Rajiv and Adnani, Lata and Frankiw, Luke S. and Lawn, Samuel O. and Blough, Michael D. and Alshehri, Mana and Wu, Wei and Marra, Marco A. and Robbins, Stephen M. and Cairncross, J. Gregory and Schuurmans, Carol and Chan, Jennifer A. (2019) Capicua regulates neural stem cell proliferation and lineage specification through control of Ets factors. Nature Communications, 10 . Art. No. 2000. ISSN 2041-1723. PMCID PMC6494820. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20180927-114224134

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Abstract

Capicua (Cic) is a transcriptional repressor mutated in the brain cancer oligodendroglioma. Despite its cancer link, little is known of Cic’s function in the brain. We show that nuclear Cic expression is strongest in astrocytes and neurons but weaker in stem cells and oligodendroglial lineage cells. Using a new conditional Cic knockout mouse, we demonstrate that forebrain-specific Cic deletion increases proliferation and self-renewal of neural stem cells. Furthermore, Cic loss biases neural stem cells toward glial lineage selection, expanding the pool of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). These proliferation and lineage effects are dependent on de-repression of Ets transcription factors. In patient-derived oligodendroglioma cells, CIC re-expression or ETV5 blockade decreases lineage bias, proliferation, self-renewal, and tumorigenicity. Our results identify Cic as an important regulator of cell fate in neurodevelopment and oligodendroglioma, and suggest that its loss contributes to oligodendroglioma by promoting proliferation and an OPC-like identity via Ets overactivity.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-09949-6DOIArticle
https://doi.org/10.1101/335984DOIDiscussion Paper
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6494820/PubMed CentralArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Ahmad, Sheikh Tanveer0000-0002-9882-8636
Chen, Myra J.0000-0001-8633-1414
Marra, Marco A.0000-0001-7146-7175
Additional Information:© 2019 The Author(s). This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Received 24 May 2017; Accepted 28 March 2019; Published 01 May 2019. Data availability: The authors declare that all data supporting the findings of this study are available within the article and its Supplementary Information files. All biological materials used in this study are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request. This work was funded by Canadian Institutes for Health Research (J.A.C.), Cancer Research Society (C.S., J.A.C.), Alberta Cancer Foundation (S.T.A., A.D.R., L.F., J.G.C.), Alberta Innovates Health Solutions (J.A.C., C.S.). We thank Edwin Herrenschmidt of Spine Visual Design for original graphic artwork. Author Contributions: Conceptualization, J.A.C., S.T.A.; methodology, J.A.C., C.S., S.T.A.; investigation, S.T.A., A.D.R., R.D., L.F., M.J.C., M.A., W.W., S.O.L., M.D.B.; acquisition, analyses, and interpretation of data, J.A.C., S.T.A., A.D.R.; writing—original draft, J.A.C., S.T.A.; writing—review & editing, J.A.C., C.S., J.G.C., S.M.R., M.A.M., W.W., R.D., S.O.L.; funding acquisition, J.A.C., J.G.C., C.S.; resources, L.A., M.A., C.S; supervision, J.A.C., C.S., J.G.C., S.M.R. The authors declare no competing interests.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)UNSPECIFIED
Cancer Research SocietyUNSPECIFIED
Alberta Cancer FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Alberta Innovates Health SolutionsUNSPECIFIED
PubMed Central ID:PMC6494820
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20180927-114224134
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20180927-114224134
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:90003
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: George Porter
Deposited On:27 Sep 2018 23:04
Last Modified:13 May 2019 17:10

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