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High-throughput ethomics in large groups of Drosophila

Branson, Kristin and Robie, Alice A. and Bender, John and Perona, Pietro and Dickinson, Michael H. (2009) High-throughput ethomics in large groups of Drosophila. Nature Methods, 6 (6). pp. 451-457. ISSN 1548-7091. PMCID PMC2734963. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20181116-113011252

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Abstract

We present a camera-based method for automatically quantifying the individual and social behaviors of fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, interacting in a planar arena. Our system includes machine-vision algorithms that accurately track many individuals without swapping identities and classification algorithms that detect behaviors. The data may be represented as an ethogram that plots the time course of behaviors exhibited by each fly or as a vector that concisely captures the statistical properties of all behaviors displayed in a given period. We found that behavioral differences between individuals were consistent over time and were sufficient to accurately predict gender and genotype. In addition, we found that the relative positions of flies during social interactions vary according to gender, genotype and social environment. We expect that our software, which permits high-throughput screening, will complement existing molecular methods available in Drosophila, facilitating new investigations into the genetic and cellular basis of behavior.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1038/nmeth.1328DOIArticle
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2734963/PubMed CentralArticle
https://rdcu.be/bbwEsPublisherFree ReadCube access
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Branson, Kristin0000-0002-5567-2512
Perona, Pietro0000-0002-7583-5809
Dickinson, Michael H.0000-0002-8587-9936
Additional Information:© 2009 Nature Publishing Group. Received 01 December 2008. Accepted 08 April 2009. Published 03 May 2009. We thank A. Straw for developing and maintaining the camera interface program, J. Simon for assistance in collecting the data presented in Supplementary Videos 6 and 7, W. Korff for help with high-resolution data acquisition and M. Arbietman (University of Southern California) for the gift of the fruitless fly lines. Funding for this research was provided by US National Institutes of Health grant R01 DA022777 (to M.H.D. and P.P.).
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NIHR01 DA022777
Issue or Number:6
PubMed Central ID:PMC2734963
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20181116-113011252
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20181116-113011252
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:90971
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: George Porter
Deposited On:16 Nov 2018 21:27
Last Modified:09 Mar 2020 13:18

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