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What Does a Successful Postdoctoral Fellowship Publication Record Look Like?

Pepper, Joshua and Krupińska, Oliwia D. and Stassun, Keivan G. and Gelino, Dawn M. (2019) What Does a Successful Postdoctoral Fellowship Publication Record Look Like? Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 131 (995). Art. No. 014501. ISSN 0004-6280. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20181127-125833929

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Abstract

Obtaining a prize postdoctoral fellowship in astronomy and astrophysics involves a number of factors, many of which cannot be quantified. One criterion that can be measured is the publication record of an applicant. The publication records of past fellowship recipients may, therefore, provide some quantitative guidance for future prospective applicants. We investigated the publication patterns of recipients of the NASA prize postdoctoral fellowships in the Hubble, Einstein, and Sagan programs from 2014 through 2017, using the NASA ADS reference system. We tabulated their publications at the point where fellowship applications were submitted, and we find that the 133 fellowship recipients in that time frame had a median of 6 ± 2 first-author publications, and 14 ± 6 co-authored publications. The full range of first-author papers is one to 15, and for all papers ranges from two to 76, indicating very diverse publication patterns. Thus, while fellowship recipients generally have strong publication records, the distribution of both first-author and co-authored papers is quite broad; there is no apparent threshold of publications necessary to obtain these fellowships. We also examined the post-PhD publication rates for each of the three fellowship programs, between male and female recipients, across the four years of the analysis and find no consistent trends. We hope that these findings will prove a useful reference to future junior scientists.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1088/1538-3873/aaea7fDOIArticle
https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.09505arXivDiscussion Paper
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Pepper, Joshua0000-0002-3827-8417
Krupińska, Oliwia D.0000-0003-1997-6831
Stassun, Keivan G.0000-0002-3481-9052
Gelino, Dawn M.0000-0003-1274-2784
Additional Information:© 2018 The Astronomical Society of the Pacific. Received 2018 September 12; accepted 2018 October 20; published 2018 November 27. We thank Andrew Fruchter and Paul Green for useful conversations. This research has made use of NASAs Astrophysics Data System.
Group:Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC)
Subject Keywords:sociology of astronomy
Issue or Number:995
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20181127-125833929
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20181127-125833929
Official Citation:Joshua Pepper et al 2019 PASP 131 014501
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:91228
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:27 Nov 2018 21:37
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 20:33

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