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ATLAS Probe: Breakthrough Science of Galaxy Evolution, Cosmology, Milky Way, and the Solar System

Wang, Yun and Kirkpatrick, J. Davy and Chary, Ranga and Helou, George and Hillenbrand, Lynne A. (2019) ATLAS Probe: Breakthrough Science of Galaxy Evolution, Cosmology, Milky Way, and the Solar System. Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia, 36 . Art. No. e015. ISSN 1323-3580. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20190107-102223398

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Abstract

Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy Probe is a concept for a National Aeronautics and Space Administration probe-class space mission that will achieve ground-breaking science in the fields of galaxy evolution, cosmology, Milky Way, and the Solar System. It is the follow-up space mission to Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), boosting its scientific return by obtaining deep 1–4 μm slit spectroscopy for ∼70% of all galaxies imaged by the ∼2 000 deg^2 WFIRST High Latitude Survey at z > 0.5. Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy will measure accurate and precise redshifts for ∼200 M galaxies out to z < 7, and deliver spectra that enable a wide range of diagnostic studies of the physical properties of galaxies over most of cosmic history. Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy Probe and WFIRST together will produce a 3D map of the Universe over 2 000 deg^2, the definitive data sets for studying galaxy evolution, probing dark matter, dark energy and modifications of General Relativity, and quantifying the 3D structure and stellar content of the Milky Way. Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy Probe science spans four broad categories: (1) Revolutionising galaxy evolution studies by tracing the relation between galaxies and dark matter from galaxy groups to cosmic voids and filaments, from the epoch of reionisation through the peak era of galaxy assembly; (2) Opening a new window into the dark Universe by weighing the dark matter filaments using 3D weak lensing with spectroscopic redshifts, and obtaining definitive measurements of dark energy and modification of General Relativity using galaxy clustering; (3) Probing the Milky Way’s dust-enshrouded regions, reaching the far side of our Galaxy; and (4) Exploring the formation history of the outer Solar System by characterising Kuiper Belt Objects. Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy Probe is a 1.5 m telescope with a field of view of 0.4 deg^2, and uses digital micro-mirror devices as slit selectors. It has a spectroscopic resolution of R = 1 000, and a wavelength range of 1–4 μm. The lack of slit spectroscopy from space over a wide field of view is the obvious gap in current and planned future space missions; Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy fills this big gap with an unprecedented spectroscopic capability based on digital micro-mirror devices (with an estimated spectroscopic multiplex factor greater than 5 000). Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy is designed to fit within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration probe-class space mission cost envelope; it has a single instrument, a telescope aperture that allows for a lighter launch vehicle, and mature technology (we have identified a path for digital micro-mirror devices to reach Technology Readiness Level 6 within 2 yr). Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy Probe will lead to transformative science over the entire range of astrophysics: from galaxy evolution to the dark Universe, from Solar System objects to the dusty regions of the Milky Way.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1017/pasa.2019.5DOIArticle
https://arxiv.org/abs/1802.01539arXivDiscussion Paper
https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20190925-085020406Related ItemAstro2020 Science White Paper
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Kirkpatrick, J. Davy0000-0003-4269-260X
Chary, Ranga0000-0001-7583-0621
Helou, George0000-0003-3367-3415
Additional Information:© 2019 Astronomical Society of Australia. Published online: 08 April 2019. We are grateful to Lee Armus, Dominic Benford, Peter Capak, Jeff Kruk, Ian Smail, John Stauffer, Mike Werner, and Rien Weygaert for invaluable discussions. We acknowledge Falk Baumgarten for help with the computation of the EZmocks, Charles Shapiro for providing information on the detectors, and Alex Merson for advice on cosmic web visualization options. Andrea Cimatti acknowledges the grants ASI n.I/023/12/0 "Attività relative alla fase B2/C per la missione Euclid" and PRIN MIUR 2015 "Cosmology and Fundamental Physics: illuminating the Dark Universe with Euclid". Wesley Fraser acknowledges funding from Science and Technology Facilities Council grant ST/P0003094/1. Christopher Hirata is supported by the US Department of Energy, NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Simons Foundation. Jeffrey Newman acknowledges support from DOE grant DOE DE-SC0007914. Zoran Ninkov acknowledges NASA’s Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) Program (grant number NNX14AI62G) in support of the development of DMD technology for use in space. James Bartlett, Olivier Doré, Peter Eisenhardt, Michael Ressler, and Jason Rhodes are supported by JPL, which is run by Caltech under a contract from NASA.
Group:Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), Astronomy Department
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI)I/023/12/0
Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (INAF)PRIN MIUR 2015
Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC)ST/P0003094/1
Department of Energy (DOE)DE-SC0007914
NASANNX14AI62G
NSFUNSPECIFIED
Simons FoundationUNSPECIFIED
NASA/JPL/CaltechUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:space mission — galaxy evolution — cosmology
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20190107-102223398
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20190107-102223398
Official Citation:Wang, Y., Robberto, M., Dickinson, M., Hillenbrand, L., Fraser, W., Behroozi, P., . . . Wechsler, R. (2019). ATLAS probe: Breakthrough science of galaxy evolution, cosmology, Milky Way, and the Solar System. Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia, 36, E015. doi:10.1017/pasa.2019.5
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:92109
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:07 Jan 2019 18:29
Last Modified:19 Nov 2019 16:05

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