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A response to Zhang et al. (2018), "Can Mouse-tracking Reveal Attribute Processing Speeds in Dietary Self-control? Commentary on Sullivan et al. (2015) and Lim et al. (2018)"

Sullivan, Nicolette and Hutcherson, Cendri and Harris, Alison and Rangel, Antonio (2019) A response to Zhang et al. (2018), "Can Mouse-tracking Reveal Attribute Processing Speeds in Dietary Self-control? Commentary on Sullivan et al. (2015) and Lim et al. (2018)". . (Unpublished) http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20190311-132254051

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Abstract

In Sullivan et al. (2015), mouse-tracking was used in a food choice paradigm to test two related hypotheses: 1) that there are differences in the relative speed with which the decision-making circuitry computes and weights the value of attributes like health and taste; and, 2) that individual differences in these relative speeds are associated with individual differences in the ability to make healthy dietary choices. Regression analysis of the mouse-tracking paths found that health became significantly predictive of the mouse's angle of movement ~195 ms later than taste, on average. Moreover, individual dietary self-control varied with estimates of the individual differences in the relative speed with which taste (tTaste) and health (tHealth) entered the decision-making process. Similar results have been found in other studies, including Lim et al. (2018) and the new data presented in Zhang et al. (2018). However, Zhang et al. (2018) argue that the conclusions of the previous work are flawed due to problems with the methods used in the previous literature. Here, we respond to each of their points. Among other results, we find that the central analysis technique used by Zhang et al. (2018) eliminates the difference in tTaste and tHealth even when it is built into a simulated dataset.


Item Type:Report or Paper (Discussion Paper)
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1101/572974DOIDiscussion Paper
https://osf.io/7yh8a/Related ItemCode
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Sullivan, Nicolette0000-0003-0313-3856
Hutcherson, Cendri0000-0002-4441-4809
Harris, Alison0000-0002-0559-2821
Additional Information:The copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted bioRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20190311-132254051
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20190311-132254051
Official Citation:A response to Zhang et al. (2018), "Can Mouse-tracking Reveal Attribute Processing Speeds in Dietary Self-control? Commentary on Sullivan et al. (2015) and Lim et al. (2018)" Nicolette J Sullivan, Cendri Hutcherson, Alison M Harris, Antonio Rangel bioRxiv 572974; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/572974
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:93687
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: George Porter
Deposited On:11 Mar 2019 20:45
Last Modified:11 Mar 2019 20:45

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