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Autonomous dynamic control of DNA nanostructure self-assembly

Green, Leopold N. and Subramanian, Hari K. K. and Mardanlou, Vahid and Kim, Jongmin and Hariadi, Rizal F. and Franco, Elisa (2019) Autonomous dynamic control of DNA nanostructure self-assembly. Nature Chemistry, 11 (6). pp. 510-520. ISSN 1755-4330. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20190429-124729592

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Abstract

Biological cells routinely reconfigure their shape using dynamic signalling and regulatory networks that direct self-assembly processes in time and space, through molecular components that sense, process and transmit information from the environment. A similar strategy could be used to enable life-like behaviours in synthetic materials. Nucleic acid nanotechnology offers a promising route towards this goal through a variety of sensors, logic and dynamic components and self-assembling structures. Here, by harnessing both dynamic and structural DNA nanotechnology, we demonstrate dynamic control of the self-assembly of DNA nanotubes—a well-known class of programmable DNA nanostructures. Nanotube assembly and disassembly is controlled with minimal synthetic gene systems, including an autonomous molecular oscillator. We use a coarse-grained computational model to capture nanotube length distribution dynamics in response to inputs from nucleic acid circuits. We hope that these results may find use for the development of responsive nucleic acid materials, with potential applications in biomaterials science, nanofabrication and drug delivery.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41557-019-0251-8DOIArticle
https://rdcu.be/bzv0fPublisherFree ReadCube access
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Green, Leopold N.0000-0001-5479-6970
Subramanian, Hari K. K.0000-0003-2956-9279
Kim, Jongmin0000-0002-2713-1006
Franco, Elisa0000-0003-1103-2668
Additional Information:© 2019 The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited. Received 10 June 2017; Accepted 06 March 2019; Published 22 April 2019. Data availability: All the data sets generated and/or analysed during this study and supporting the findings described are available within the Article and its Supplementary Information and/or from the corresponding author upon reasonable request. The authors thank M. Weitz for initial assistance with experiments and P.W.K. Rothemund, E. Winfree, R. Schulman, B. Yurke, G. Seelig, F. Ricci and L. Mangolini for helpful advice and discussions. This research was primarily supported by the US Department of Energy under grant SC0010595, which paid for reagents and salary for H.K.K.S., L.N.G., V.M. and E.F. The authors also acknowledge funding by the Bourns College of Engineering at U.C. Riverside and by the US National Science Foundation through grant CMMI-1266402, which supported V.M. and the experimental and modelling work on the molecular oscillator. Author Contributions: E.F., J.K. and R.F.H. conceived and designed research and analysed the data. L.N.G. and H.K.K.S. designed and performed the experiments and analysed the data. V.M. and J.K. performed numerical simulations. E.F., L.N.G. and H.K.K.S. co-wrote the paper. The authors declare no competing interests.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Department of Energy (DOE)SC0010595
University of California, RiversideUNSPECIFIED
NSFCMMI-1266402
Subject Keywords:Biochemical reaction networks; DNA and RNA; DNA nanostructures; Self-assembly; Synthetic biology
Issue or Number:6
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20190429-124729592
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20190429-124729592
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:95073
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:29 Apr 2019 19:59
Last Modified:11 Nov 2020 20:40

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