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Expert-like performance of an autonomous spike tracking algorithm in isolating and maintaining single units in the macaque cortex

Chakrabarti, Shubhodeep and Hebert, Paul and Wolf, Michael T. and Campos, Michael and Burdick, Joel W. and Gail, Alexander (2012) Expert-like performance of an autonomous spike tracking algorithm in isolating and maintaining single units in the macaque cortex. Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 205 (1). pp. 72-85. ISSN 0165-0270. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20190619-093656143

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Abstract

Isolating action potentials of a single neuron (unit) is essential for intra-cortical neurophysiological recordings. Yet, during extracellular recordings in semi-chronic awake preparations, the relationship between neuronal soma and the recording electrode is typically not stationary. Neuronal waveforms often change in shape, and in the absence of counter-measures, merge with the background noise. To avoid this, experimenters can repeatedly re-adjust electrode positions to maintain the shapes of isolated spikes. In recordings with a larger number of electrodes, this process becomes extremely difficult. We report the performance of an automated algorithm that tracks neurons to obtain well isolated spiking, and autonomously adjusts electrode position to maintain good isolation. We tested the performance of this algorithm in isolating units with multiple individually adjustable micro-electrodes in a cortical surface area of macaque monkeys. We compared the performance in terms of signal quality and signal stability against passive placement of microelectrodes and against the performance of three human experts. The results show that our SpikeTrack2 algorithm achieves significantly better signal quality compared to passive placement. It is as least as good as humans in initially finding and isolating units, and better as the average and at least as good as the most proficient of three human experimenters in maintaining signal quality and signal stability. The autonomous tracking performance, the scalability of the system to large numbers of individual channels, and the possibility to objectify single unit recording criteria makes SpikeTrack2 a highly valuable tool for all multi-channel recording systems with individually adjustable electrodes.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneumeth.2011.12.018DOIArticle
Additional Information:© 2012 Elsevier B.V. Received 15 September 2011, Revised 20 December 2011, Accepted 21 December 2011, Available online 29 December 2011. The authors thank Pablo Martinez-Vazquez for his help with the statistical analyses for spike stability measures and Stephanie Westendorff and Christian Klaes for allowing access to their data for comparisons between humans and SpikeTrack2. This study was supported by the Federal Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF, Germany) grants 01GQ0433, 01GQ0814 and 01GQ1005C awarded to AG, and a postdoctoral stipend awarded to SC by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF)01GQ0433
Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF)01GQ0814
Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF)01GQ1005C
Alexander von Humboldt FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:Spike tracking; Signal quality; Signal stability; Electrode motion; Neuronal waveforms
Issue or Number:1
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20190619-093656143
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20190619-093656143
Official Citation:Shubhodeep Chakrabarti, Paul Hebert, Michael T. Wolf, Michael Campos, Joel W. Burdick, Alexander Gail, Expert-like performance of an autonomous spike tracking algorithm in isolating and maintaining single units in the macaque cortex, Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Volume 205, Issue 1, 2012, Pages 72-85, ISSN 0165-0270, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneumeth.2011.12.018. (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165027011007552)
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:96520
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:19 Jun 2019 16:41
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 21:23

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