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Clinical Translation of Photoacoustic Tomography

Erpelding, Todd N. and Maslov, Konstantin I. and Appleton, Catherine M. and Margenthaler, Julie A. and Pashley, Michael D. and Zou, Jun and Culver, Joseph P. and Akers, Walter J. and Achilefu, Samuel and Pan, Dipanjan and Lanza, Gregory M. and Wang, Lihong V. (2014) Clinical Translation of Photoacoustic Tomography. In: Translational Research in Biophotonics: Four National Cancer Institute Case Studies. Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers , Bellingham, WA, Ch. 5. ISBN 9781628410686. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20190916-144534407

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Abstract

The detection of regional lymph node metastases is important in cancer staging as it influences the prognosis of the patient and the strategy for treatment. Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) has emerged as the standard of care for axillary staging of clinically node-negative breast cancer.1,2 The SLN hypothesis states that the pathological status of the axilla can be accurately predicted by determining the status of the first (i.e., sentinel) lymph node(s) that drains from the primary tumor. Besides the presence of metastasis or micrometastasis detected in the SLN after excision and histological examination, the total number of involved regional lymph nodes is important in staging the disease, with the number predicting overall survival with an inverse relationship. Typically, the conventional SLNB procedure consists of injecting radioactive tracers and/or MB dye to mark the lymphatic system and guide the surgeon to the sentinel node. The radioactive tracer is injected a few hours prior to the surgery, while MB, which spreads relatively quickly through lymph vessels, is injected in the operating room. A few minutes following MB injection, a surgical incision is made in the area indicated by a handheld Geiger counter. The surgeon interrogates the axilla and identifies nodes that have been stained blue or nodes that are detected as radioactive with the Geiger counter. These nodes are then removed for histological examination to determine the presence of tumor metastases.


Item Type:Book Section
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1117/3.1002515.ch5DOIArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Maslov, Konstantin I.0000-0003-3408-8840
Zou, Jun0000-0002-9543-6135
Wang, Lihong V.0000-0001-9783-4383
Additional Information:© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20190916-144534407
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20190916-144534407
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:98661
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:16 Sep 2019 21:53
Last Modified:09 Mar 2020 13:19

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