CaltechAUTHORS
  A Caltech Library Service

The spectral energy distributions of active galactic nuclei

Brown, M. J. I. and Duncan, K. J. and Landt, H. and Kirk, M. and Ricci, C. and Kamraj, N. and Salvato, M. and Ananna, T. (2019) The spectral energy distributions of active galactic nuclei. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 489 (3). pp. 3351-3367. ISSN 0035-8711. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20191024-105040098

[img] PDF - Published Version
See Usage Policy.

3602Kb
[img] PDF - Accepted Version
See Usage Policy.

1890Kb
[img] Archive (ZIP) (Supplementary data) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

9Kb

Use this Persistent URL to link to this item: https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20191024-105040098

Abstract

We present spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 41 active galactic nuclei, derived from multiwavelength photometry and archival spectroscopy. All of the SEDs span at least 0.09 to 30 μm, but in some instances wavelength coverage extends into the X-ray, far-infrared, and radio. For some active galactic nuclei (AGNs) we have fitted the measured far-infrared photometry with greybody models, while radio flux density measurements have been approximated by power laws or polynomials. We have been able to fill some of the gaps in the spectral coverage using interpolation or extrapolation of simple models. In addition to the 41 individual AGN SEDs, we have produced 72 Seyfert SEDs by mixing SEDs of the central regions of Seyferts with galaxy SEDs. Relative to the literature, our templates have broader wavelength coverage and/or higher spectral resolution. We have tested the utility of our SEDs by using them to generate photometric redshifts for 0 < z ≤ 6.12 AGNs in the Boötes field (selected with X-ray, IR, and optical criteria) and, relative to SEDs from the literature, they produce comparable or better photometric redshifts with reduced flux density residuals.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stz2324DOIArticle
https://arxiv.org/abs/1908.03720arXivDiscussion Paper
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Brown, M. J. I.0000-0002-1207-9137
Duncan, K. J.0000-0001-6889-8388
Ricci, C.0000-0001-5231-2645
Kamraj, N.0000-0002-3233-2451
Salvato, M.0000-0001-7116-9303
Additional Information:© 2019 The Author(s) Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model). Accepted 2019 August 6. Received 2019 July 9; in original form 2018 December 26. Published: 30 August 2019. A number of astronomers generously shared their knowledge and reduced spectra while we prepared this paper, including A. Barth, R. Decarli, M. Elvis, E. Glikman, R. Hickox, N. Hurley-Walker, M. Koss, J. Kuraszkiewicz, I. Lamperti, J. McDowell, C. Mundell, K. Oh, R. Riffel, A. Rodríguez-Ardila, D. Rupke, P. Smith, G. Snyder, P. F. Spinelli, D. Stern, C. Tadhunter, S. Veilleux, S. White, and B. Wilkes. M. Kirk undertook preliminary work for this paper as part of a Monash University PHS 3350 undergraduate research project. We thank M. Durré for reducing the European Southern Observatory (ESO) SINFONI spectra used in this paper. Some of the data presented in this paper were obtained from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. This work is based in part on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 60.A-9339(A), 091.B-0256(A), 091.B-0900(B), 095.B-0015(A), 097.B-0080(A), and 097.B-0640(A). This research has made use of data and/or software provided by the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), which is a service of the Astrophysics Science Division at NASA/GSFC and the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. This work is based in part on observations made with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer(GALEX). GALEX is a NASA Small Explorer, whose mission was developed in cooperation with the Centre National d’Études Spatiales (CNES) of France and the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology. GALEX was operated for NASA by the California Institute of Technology under NASA contract NAS5-98034. The Swift UVOT was designed and built in collaboration between MSSL, PSU, SwRI, Swales Aerospace, and GSFC, and was launched by NASA. Funding for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, and the Participating Institutions. SDSS-IV acknowledges support and resources from the Center for High-Performance Computing at the University of Utah. SDSS-IV is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium for the Participating Institutions of the SDSS Collaboration. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys (PS1) have been made possible through contributions of the Institute for Astronomy, the University of Hawaii, the Pan-STARRS Project Office, the Max-Planck Society and its participating institutes, the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching, The Johns Hopkins University, Durham University, the University of Edinburgh, Queen’s University Belfast, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network Incorporated, the National Central University of Taiwan, the Space Telescope Science Institute, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX08AR22G issued through the Planetary Science Division of the NASA Science Mission Directorate, the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-1238877, the University of Maryland, and Eotvos Lorand University (ELTE). The national facility capability for SkyMapper has been funded through Australian Research Council (ARC) LIEF grant LE130100104 from the Australian Research Council, awarded to the University of Sydney, the Australian National University, Swinburne University of Technology, the University of Queensland, the University of Western Australia, the University of Melbourne, Curtin University of Technology, Monash University, and the Australian Astronomical Observatory. SkyMapper is owned and operated by The Australian National University’s Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics. The survey data were processed and provided by the SkyMapper Team at ANU. The SkyMapper node of the All-Sky Virtual Observatory (ASVO) is hosted at the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI). Development and support of the SkyMapper node of the ASVO has been funded in part by Astronomy Australia Limited (AAL) and the Australian Government through the Commonwealth’s Education Investment Fund (EIF) and National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS), particularly the National eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources (NeCTAR) and the Australian National Data Service Projects (ANDS). This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation. This research is based in part on observations with Akari, a JAXA project with the participation of European Space Agency (ESA). This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. This publication makes use of data products from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, which is a joint project of the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This publication makes use of data products from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, which is a joint project of the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA. Based in part on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA. The WMAP mission is made possible by the support of the Office of Space Sciences at NASA Headquarters and by the hard and capable work of scores of scientists, engineers, technicians, machinists, data analysts, budget analysts, managers, administrative staff, and reviewers. This scientific work makes use of the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory, operated by CSIRO. We acknowledge the Wajarri Yamatji people as the traditional owners of the Observatory site. Support for the operation of the MWA is provided by the Australian Government (NCRIS), under a contract to Curtin University administered by Astronomy Australia Limited. We acknowledge the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre which is supported by the Western Australian and Australian Governments. This research has made use of NASA’s Astrophysics Data System Bibliographic Services. This research has made use of the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NASANAS5-26555
NASANAS5-98034
Alfred P. Sloan FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Department of Energy (DOE)UNSPECIFIED
Participating InstitutionsUNSPECIFIED
NASANNX08AR22G
NSFAST-1238877
University of MarylandUNSPECIFIED
Eotvos Lorand University (ELTE)UNSPECIFIED
Australian Research CouncilLE130100104
NASA/JPL/CaltechUNSPECIFIED
ESA Member StatesUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:galaxies: active – galaxies: distances and redshifts – quasars: emission lines – quasars: general – galaxies: Seyfert
Issue or Number:3
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20191024-105040098
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20191024-105040098
Official Citation:M J I Brown, K J Duncan, H Landt, M Kirk, C Ricci, N Kamraj, M Salvato, T Ananna, The spectral energy distributions of active galactic nuclei, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Volume 489, Issue 3, November 2019, Pages 3351–3367, https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stz2324
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:99436
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:24 Oct 2019 20:50
Last Modified:09 Mar 2020 13:18

Repository Staff Only: item control page